Where Is Marijuana Legal?

Where Is Marijuana Legal?

Even as Americans grow more divided politically, cannabis continues to gain ground with every election cycle—five states legalized weed this year, four of them for recreational use. That brings the number of states where recreational use is permitted to 15; cannabis (as opposed to THC-free CBD) is still wholly illegal in 14 states. Every other state falls somewhere in-between.

Of course, weed is also still illegal at the federal level.

It’s classified as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act, putting it in the same category as heroin and other drugs considered to have “no medical use” and a high potential for abuse and dependence. Though efforts are underway to change the classification, for now, state laws simply allow exemptions for certain uses.

It’s easy to get confused about whether you should disclose cannabis use to a life insurer.…

Read more

Here’s a rundown of where weed is legal for recreational and medical use (and where it isn’t).

States that legalized weed in November 2020

Five states had marijuana measures on the ballot in this year’s election—and all five approved weed by a solid margin.

  • Arizona: Prop 207 legalized marijuana growth, possession, and sales for those over 21. It will also expunge some past marijuana-related criminal offenses. Arizonans will be allowed to grow and possess limited amounts of weed after Nov. 30, and the state expects to begin sales by April 20, 2021.
  • Mississippi: Initiative 65 launches a medical marijuana program in Mississippi for 22 health conditions. The law takes effect in August 2021.
  • Montana: While Montana already allowed medical marijuana, Initiative 190 legalized possession, recreational use, and sales to adults over 21. It also permits those convicted of weed-related crimes to apply for resentencing or expungement. Most of the measure will take effect on Oct. 1, 2021. The initiative has overwhelming support, but not all news outlets consider it final as of this writing.
  • New Jersey: Question 1 legalized recreational weed for adults 21 and older, and New Jersey’s existing medical marijuana dispensaries will be allowed to sell to the general public as soon as lawmakers pass a bill covering regulations. Implementation won’t be immediate, but state senators have said they expect to move quickly.
  • South Dakota: South Dakota passed two ballot measures—one establishing a medical marijuana program and the other legalizing weed possession, use, transport, and distribution for all adults. The latter, Amendment A, will take effect on July 1, 2021, though it could take longer to license dispensaries. The measure does not permit people to grow weed at home if there is a dispensary in their district.

States that have legalized recreational marijuana

In 15 states, including 2020's new additions, weed is treated alcohol—it’s legal for adults (21 and over) to purchase and is regulated and taxed by the government. The specifics of what you can purchase and possess (and where) vary a bit by state. These states also have medical marijuana.

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Illinois
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Montana
  • Nevada
  • New Jersey
  • Oregon
  • South Dakota
  • Vermont
  • Washington

Recreational weed is also legal in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.

In the District of Columbia, it’s legal to possess and grow limited amounts of weed, but there are no commercial sales outside of medical marijuana from a limited number of licensed dispensaries.

States that have medical cannabis laws

A number of states have legalized medical marijuana but do not allow broader recreational use.

  • Arkansas
  • Connecticut*
  • Delaware*
  • Florida
  • Hawaii*
  • Louisiana
  • Maryland*
  • Minnesota*
  • Mississippi*
  • Missouri*
  • New Hampshire*
  • New Mexico*
  • New York*
  • North Dakota*
  • Ohio*
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania
  • Puerto Rico
  • Rhode Island*
  • Utah
  • Virginia*
  • West Virginia

*According to the Marijuana Policy Project, these states have also decriminalized marijuana, reducing or removing jail time for possession of limited amounts of weed.

States that have decriminalized weed

Nebraska and North Carolina have laws that decriminalize marijuana to a degree, meaning penalties for first-time possession of small amounts of weed are reduced. Both have a suspended sentence for a first offense—Nebraska imposes a fine and a possible drug education course. Medical marijuana legislation has failed in both states.

States that have, well, (almost) nothing

The remaining states do not permit broad medical or recreational marijuana—nor is weed decriminalized—though all except for Idaho allow access to low-THC products containing CBD for medical use.

  • Alabama
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

An earlier version of this story included a graphic with errors. Washington and Vermont were incorrectly listed as states with legal medical marijuana rather than legal recreational use. Virginia was incorrectly categorized as having no medical marijuana program, but its first dispensaries opened in 2020.

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Источник: https://lifehacker.com/where-is-weed-legal-1845595270

Where Is Marijuana Legal?

Recreational marijuana use became legal in just one more state, Illinois, with the start of the New Year on Wednesday. More states could follow suit in 2020, with several states set to put recreational marijuana on the ballot. Cannabis is still considered an illegal substance at the federal level. 

According to an end of the year CBS News Poll, support for legal pot hit a new high in 2019, with 65% of U.S. adults saying marijuana should be legal.

And, for the first time in CBS News polling, a majority of Republicans (56%) favored legal marijuana.

While people ages 65 and over continued to be the least ly age group to support marijuana legalization, slightly more of them favored it (49%) than opposed it (45%) in the 2019 poll.  

The trend has been reflected in state legislatures, albeit piecemeal. Thirty three states have legalized pot in some form, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Since 2012 — when Colorado and Washington became the first two states to legalize recreational use — 11 states in total have legalized recreational marijuana.

Marijuana is currently legal for recreational use in: Alaska, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, Washington and the District of Columbia. On January, 1, 2020, Illinois became the 11th state to legalize recreational marijuana. 

Illinois 

Democratic Governor JB Pritzker granted more than 11,000 pardons for low-level marijuana convictions on Tuesday, ahead of the state's official legalization — which the Legislature passed in June — effective on Wednesday. State officials estimate that 116,000 convictions involving 30 grams or less of marijuana, including for possession of the drug, are eligible for pardons under the new law.

Illinois is now the second state in the Midwest, following Michigan in 2018, to legalize recreational marijuana sales and use. 

What's ahead?

Several states are expected to vote on recreational marijuana use measures in 2020, while others are preparing similar legislation. 

Florida 

Make It Legal Florida, a political committee, is behind a proposal to legalize recreational marijuana in the state. Chairman Nick Hansen told CBS Miami in early December that, according to their polling, over 65 percent of Florida voters “want to have expanded access to cannabis for 21 and over.”

However, that milestone appears to have hit a snag. The Miami Herald reports that Make it Legal filed a lawsuit against the state on Tuesday, alleging that a new election law placed restrictions on the ballot initiative process that hampered their ability to collect signatures. 

As of Tuesday, the state had verified 219,290 signed petitions from Make It Legal — just 28% of the total signatures needed by the February 1 deadline.

Minnesota 

Democrats in the state are preparing marijuana legislation, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reports. House Majority leader Ryan Winkler (D) has been touring the state on the issue in an effort to ready a bill for the state's session in February. 

The Republican-controlled Senate, however, poses steep odds, as key conservative leaders remain opposed to legalization.

New York

Last year proved lackluster for recreational marijuana legislation efforts in the Empire State. 

A measure to legalize cannabis for adults went up in smoke, despite support from Governor Andrew Cuomo. Legislators did downgrade possession from a misdemeanor to a fine, but people with more than two ounces of the drug on them can still be arrested, according to the New York Police Department. 

Cuomo has continued to push the issue, hiring Norman Birenbaum, a major force in pro-legalization efforts, to lead the state's cannabis program.  

New Jersey 

The state will vote on legalization of recreational marijuana in November, 2020, The Associated Press reports. If the measure passes, New Jersey residents 21 and older will be allowed to use pot recreationally. All sales of cannabis products would be subject to a 6.625% sales tax. 

Virginia 

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring has called for the “immediate decriminalization” of possession of small amounts of marijuana, and hosted a Cannabis Summit in December to educate state leaders on what steps need to be taken to accomplish that goal. 

“The system is broken. It's unjust. It's not working and the way to fix it, first of all, is to move and decriminalize possession of small amounts and address those past convictions. But for me, I think we should move to legalize and regulate adult use,” Herring said, CBS affiliate WTVR reports. 

He may have the support he needs, as the Commonwealth of Virginia's House and Senate are now controlled by Democrats, who tend to favor marijuana reform. 

One piece of marijuana legislation that has been filed for the state's 2020 session, SB 2, would decriminalize marijuana possession, and would raise the amount needed to be charged with distribution to one ounce versus half-an-ounce, WTVR reports. The bill would also allow people to petition to expunge their convictions.

California is still fine-tuning its cannabis regulation  

On January 1, 2020, two new laws went into effect in California that clarify tax laws related to the state's legal cannabis industry — which competes with it's long-established illegal cannabis industry. 

Senate Bill 34 allows licensed cannabis retailers to donate cannabis to low-income patients, and exempts those products from state taxes, CBS affiliate KFMB reports. Assembly Bill 37, allows cannabis businesses to claim deductions and credits available to other legal businesses in the state. 

Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom signed those bills into law, but “begrudgingly” vetoed another cannabis bill that would have required some health care facilities to allow terminally ill patients to use medical cannabis. In a message explaining his decision, Newsom wrote that the requirement would put patients on Medicaid and Medicare at risk of losing coverage. 

Is federal legalization ly in 2020?

Since cannabis is still considered an illegal substance at the federal level, most banks are prevented from doing business with marijuana companies. To face this hurdle, lawmakers introduced the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act, which would protect banks who partner with cannabis businesses, CBS Miami reports. 

The Act passed the Democratic-led House, but is expected to fail in the Senate, after Banking Committee Chairman Mike Crapo (R-ID) expressed his strong opposition in December.

“Significant concerns remain that the SAFE Banking Act does not address the high level potency of marijuana, marketing tactics to children, lack of research on marijuana's effects, and the need to prevent bad actors and cartels from using the banks to disguise ill-gotten cash to launder money into the financial system,” Crapo said in a press release outlining his concerns.

The same fate is ly for federal cannabis legalization.

In November, the House Judiciary Committee approved a bill that would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level. The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act of 2019, or MORE Act, now heads to the full House, where its chances are better in the Democratic-controlled chamber than in the Republican-held Senate, where the bill's future is uncertain.

Источник: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/where-is-marijuana-legal-in-2020-illinois-joins-10-other-states-legalizing-recreational-pot-2020-01-01/

15 States, D.C. Legalized Weed U.S. – Where Is Marijuana Legal 2020?

Where Is Marijuana Legal?

Weed is so normalized in America that it’s hardly cool anymore. Once Martha Stewart, Elon Musk, and your aunt—not even the eccentric one—started talking about marijuana it was ibuprofen, it felt it lost its gloried grunge.

Long gone are the days of dirty bongs, replaced by high-tech vaporizers and edibles ranging from extravagant chocolate candies to curated, catered dining experiences. Oh, and hundred-thousand-dollar bongs that are coveted art, because they are art.

Brewers are dabbling in non-alcoholic THC beers, and the country’s first-ever weed restaurant, where you can smoke and dine in public without feeling anything more than your regular dose of paranoia, opened in West Hollywood.

Weed has a golden cloud around it, where traditional fears have been replaced by excitement, at least on the grand scale. (If you want to know where all that pent-up reefer madness went, take a look at our national nicotine vape situation.)

Obviously, legalization has a lot to do with that. In the U.S., recreational marijuana legalization is slowly eking out victories on a state-by-state basis. In the 2016 election, which was bad for most reasons but good for this one, four states got on board, raising the total to eight states to legalize since Colorado kicked off the movement in 2012.

On the first day of 2020, Illinois became the eleventh state in America to legalize weed, with lines snaking along blocks for hours on day one. And then, on Election Day 2020, with the presidential vote still infuriatingly undecided either way, another four states added their numbers to the growing pack: Arizona, New Jersey, Montana, and South Dakota.

At this point, it's hardly a surprise that yet another state has decided to make itself a haven for marijuana users (as well as businesses tapping into the lucrative marijuana market).

About one in three Americans now live where all adults have access to it, according to Politico. That's 93 million of us.

If you’re keen on placing bets, then look to New York, Florida, and Ohio as the states that could pass legalization efforts in 2021.

But as states legalize and business booms, as celebrities enjoyed marijuana goodies in their Oscars swag bags and influencers sucked on vape pens for the 'gram, marijuana has led to vast inequality in America.

Historically, law enforcement grossly targeted minority people, even though white people statistically use marijuana at the same rate. While cannabis brands blossom on social media, people still sit in prison for nonviolent drug offenses.

Expungement of criminal records and cannabis business practices that protect the communities most ripped apart by the War on Drugs are necessary, and must go hand in hand with legalization in the states. Or, at the federal level.

While he was in his Attorney General post, Jeff Sessions—Remember him? The flaming racist who thinks “good people don't smoke marijuana?”—rescinded an Obama-era memo that protected states where marijuana was legal from most federal prosecution.

But more and more politicians on both sides of the aisle are at least trying to give states the right to decide for themselves.

Last spring, prominent members of Congress introduced the bipartisan Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act, which would protect states' rights to determine their own marijuana laws without federal interference. Under a Biden presidency, marijuana would also stand a good chance of being decriminalized, at the very least.

President Trump generally has respected the rights of states to decide for themselves, though he's fallen far short of calling for substantive drug law reform.

(He does, it should be noted, think marijuana makes people “lose IQ points,” a fact we present without comment.

) Nothing big has happened in Washington since the 2018 federal legalization of hemp, and in a way, CBD, but politicians continue to debate cannabis at a low-level hum, which is an improvement, relatively speaking.

By the way, Canada officially legalized weed throughout the entire damn country in 2018. Aren't they just so lucky. As we wait our turn, keep an eye on psilocybin, the active compound in shrooms that was just legalized for therapeutic use in Oregon.

Who knows? Maybe one day our federal government will get it together. Until then, here are the 15 states plus the District of Columbia where it's legal to buy and consume recreational marijuana, as well as the 35 states plus D.C. that have approved medical marijuana.

These are the 15 states, plus Washington, D.C., that have legalized recreational weed—and medical marijuana, as well. Laws about possession, distribution, personal cultivation, and concentrates differ across state lines. NORML, a nonprofit group that advocates for marijuana reform, has a more detailed, state-by-state rundown.

Alaska

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to six marijuana plants per household, but no more than three can be mature and flowering at a time.

Arizona

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to six plants per household.

California

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to six marijuana plants per household.

Colorado

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to six plants per household, but no more than three can be mature at a time.

District of Columbia

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to two ounces of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to six plants per household, but no more than three can be mature at a time.

Illinois

• It is legal for Illinois residents 21 and over to possess up to 30 grams of marijuana (roughly 1.06 ounces). Non-Illinois residents 21 and over can only possess 15 grams of marijuana (roughly half an ounce).
• It is legal for registered medical marijuana patients to grow up to five plants per household that are five inches or taller.

Maine

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to have up to three flowering plants and 12 immature plants growing per household.

Massachusetts

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana outside the home, and up to 10 ounces of marijuana inside the home.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to six plants per household.

Michigan

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana outside the home, and up to 10 ounces of marijuana inside the home.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to 12 plants per household.

Montana

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to four plants for personal use.

New Jersey

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess a yet undecided amount of marijuana.

Nevada

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to six plants per household.

Oregon

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana outside the home, and up to eight ounces of homegrown marijuana inside the home.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to four plants per household.

South Dakota

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to three plants for personal use.

Vermont

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana.
• It is legal for adults 21 and over to grow up to six plants per household, only two of which can be mature.

Washington

• It is legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana in private.
• It is illegal to grow plants.

In addition to the 15 states plus D.C. with legalized recreational weed—and therefore legal medical marijuana—these 20 states have legalized just medical marijuana.

• Arkansas• Connecticut• Delaware• Florida• Hawaii • Louisiana• Maryland • Minnesota• Mississippi• Missouri• New Hampshire• New Mexico• New York• North Dakota• Ohio• Oklahoma• Pennsylvania• Rhode Island• Utah

• West Virginia

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Источник: https://www.esquire.com/lifestyle/a21719186/all-states-that-legalized-weed-in-us/

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