What does it mean to shelter in place?

What Does Shelter In Place Mean? – What Are Stay at Home Orders?

What does it mean to shelter in place?

It’s completely jarring these days when you turn on the TV, and all the happy people in commercials and sitcoms are meeting for coffee, romping on the beach, and having dinner with friends who don’t live in their immediate household. It’s a reminder of life before the COVID-19 crisis made “social distancing” and “shelter in place” the new normal.

But even with more than 300 million Americans under orders to stay home unless absolutely necessary, the terminology can be a little confusing.

For example, the earliest order to stay home came on March 16 from the San Francisco Department of Public Health, which used the term “shelter in place” when telling Bay Area residents to stay at home to try to slow down the spread of the deadly virus.

The next major proclamation came on March 19, when California Governor Gavin Newsom released an executive order asking everyone in the state to “stay at home.

” The following day, when New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the New York State on PAUSE (Policies Assure Uniform Safety for Everyone) plan, he was very careful not to use the term “shelter in place,” which he said was a scary phrase, too closely connected to situations such as school shootings. “Words matter,” pointed out the governor.

As COVID-19 started to spread, most states followed with their own executive orders: As of this article's publish date, the only states that have no restrictions in place are North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, and Arkansas. And while individual cities in Wyoming, Utah, South Carolina, and Oklahoma have issued their own stay-home rules, there are no statewide orders.

While some of 42 states now on lockdown have their own unique rules (for example, in Hawaii, surfing and swimming are considered essential activities), they mostly follow the same guidelines. Here’s what you need to know:

What does “shelter in place” actually mean?

In the past, “shelter in place” has been used to instruct people to stay safely in the building (or car) that they're already in, rather than trying to evacuate or run for safety when there's an immediate danger outside, such as an active shooter, a wild animal on the loose, or a bomb. In 2020, however, the term has taken on a very different meaning: It is a government order for all nonessential workers to stay at home for an extended period of time, going out only for very specific reasons, and maintaining social distancing, all to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Shobeir AnsariGetty Images

Who is allowed to go to work?

While everyone may rightly believe the work they do is essential, most states have deemed only the businesses that keep society safely running are “essential.” These include (but are not limited to):

  • Grocery stores and convenience stores
  • Pharmacies
  • Health care providers
  • Child care providers
  • Animal shelters, veterinary offices, pet-food stores
  • Restaurants offering takeout or delivery
  • Gas stations
  • Laundromats, dry cleaners
  • Funeral homes
  • Dentists, therapists
  • Transportation and infrastructure workers
  • Hotels and airlines
  • News media
  • Homeless shelters/food banks

Are you allowed to leave your house at all?

Yes, but with restrictions. If you are not an essential worker, stay at home unless you have to buy groceries, pick up takeout food or medications, go to the doctor, or take your dog for a walk.

You are allowed to go outside for exercise and fresh air, but do it with an abundance of caution, including wearing face masks and remaining 6 feet away from anyone who is not in your immediate household.

The elderly and those with greater health risks, such as those with HIV, heart disease, diabetes, or chronic lung disease, are advised to stay in at all times, except for absolute necessities, such as doctor visits and to buy food (some stores are setting aside certain hours for seniors-only shopping to help reduce the risk).

What is definitely not allowed during a shelter in place order?

Any nonessential gatherings of any kind. No birthday parties, picnics, soccer games, dinner parties, group walks (unless everyone is walking very, very far apart).

Also, cancel any nonessential travel, whether that means taking the subway or bus to hang out with a friend, or traveling to another state.

If you need to have social time with friends, meeting up over FaceTime or Zoom will have to do for now.

What will happen if you break the rules?

It depends on the state, but many have said they will impose fines — or even criminal charges — if businesses or individuals are caught disregarding the rules.

In New York, for example, Governor Cuomo said, “These are legal provisions. They will be enforced. There will be a civil fine and mandatory closure for any business that is not in compliance.

” And some states, Michigan, have announced fines up to $1,000 for any civilians who are caught breaking the order.

To find out exactly what the rules are in your state, click on this map, which is updated regularly.

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Источник: https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/a32066121/what-does-shelter-in-place-mean/

Shelter

What does it mean to shelter in place?

Sheltering is appropriate when conditions require that you seek protection in your home, where you work or other location when other emergencies arise. The length of time you are required to take shelter may be short, such as during a tornado warning, or  during a pandemic. In all cases, it is important that you stay informed and follow the instructions of local authorities.

During extended periods of sheltering you will need to manage water and food supplies to make sure you and your family have what you need to get by. Read more about managing water and managing food.

Choosing to take shelter is necessary in many emergencies. This can mean: Stay-At- Home, Going to a Mass Care Shelter, or Sheltering in Place. Here’s the distinction:

Stay-at-Home

  • Remain indoors as much as possible and try to only leave your home when necessary. You can still use outdoor spaces such as patios, porches and yards.
  • Outdoor activities such as walking, jogging and exercise are fine if you practice social distancing (maintaining six feet away from the next person).
  • When outside, try not to touch anything (light signals, poles, signs, playground equipment, benches, etc.) because the coronavirus can remain on certain surfaces for multiple hours.
  • Essential services such as grocery shopping, the gas station, pharmacies and going to the Post Office are still fine to do.
  • Limit visitors if possible. Try to use video chatting. Call the people you would normally text.
  • For the latest information on food safety tips related to COVID-19 visit the U.S. Food & Drug Administration Consumer page.

Mass Care Shelter

Mass care shelters provide life sustaining services to disaster survivors.

  Even though mass care shelters often provide water, food, medicine and basic sanitary facilities, you should plan to take your emergency supply kit with you so you will have the supplies you need.

Mass care sheltering can involve living with many people in a confined space, which can be difficult and unpleasant. 

  • Check with local officials about what shelter spaces are available.  Coronavirus may have altered your community’s plans.

Search for open shelters by texting SHELTER and a ZIP code to 43362. Example: Shelter 01234 (standard rates apply).

Learn more by visiting: http://www.disasterassistance.gov/.

Sheltering in Place

Whether you are at home, work or anywhere else you frequent regularly, there may be situations when it's best to stay where you are and avoid any uncertainty outside. 

Here are some indicators and steps to take if the situation arises:

  • Use common sense and available information to assess the situation and determine if there is immediate danger.
  • If you see large amounts of debris in the air, or if local authorities say the air is badly contaminated you may want to take this kind of action.

Here are some tips for sheltering in place:

  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do.
  • Watch TV and listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
  • Bring your family and pets inside.
  • Lock doors, close windows, air vents and fireplace dampers.
  • Turn off fans, air conditioning and forced air heating systems.
  • Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated.
  • Go into an interior room with few windows if possible.
  • Seal all windows, doors and air vents with thick plastic sheeting and duct tape. Consider measuring and cutting the sheeting in advance to save time.
  • Cut the plastic sheeting several inches wider than the openings and label each sheet.
  • Duct tape plastic at corners first and then tape down all edges.
  • Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to seal gaps so that you create a barrier between yourself and any contamination.

“Sealing a room” is considered a temporary protective measure to create a barrier between you and potentially contaminated air outside. This type of sheltering in place requires pre-planning, by purchasing plastic sheeting and duct tape that you would keep in your emergency supply kit.

Источник: https://www.ready.gov/shelter

Sheltering in Place

What does it mean to shelter in place?

Certain types of emergencies, such as a chemical accident or natural disasters, make going outdoors dangerous. Instead, it's safer to stay indoors and shelter in place.

“Shelter in place” means to make a shelter the place you are in. It is a way for you to make the building as safe as possible to protect yourself until help arrives.

You should not try to shelter in a vehicle unless you have no other choice. Vehicles are not air-tight enough to give you adequate protection from chemicals.

Preparing to shelter in place

Choose a room in your house or apartment for your shelter. The best room to use for the shelter is a room with as few windows and doors as possible. A large room, preferably with a water supply, is desirable, something a master bedroom that is connected to a bathroom.

For chemical events, this room should be as high in the structure as possible to avoid vapors (gases) that sink. Turn off the air conditioning system. Close all windows and doors.

For tornadoes and other severe weather, the shelter should be low in the home, located in an interior room or closet.

You might not be at home if the need to shelter in place ever arises, but if you are at home, the following items would be good to have on hand. (Ideally, all of these items would be stored in the shelter room to save time.)

  • First aid kit
  • Food and bottled water. Store one gallon of water per person in plastic bottles as well as ready-to-eat foods that will keep without refrigeration at the shelter in place location. If you do not have bottled water, or if you run out, you can drink water from a toilet tank (not from a toilet bowl).
  • Flashlight, battery-powered radio, and extra batteries for both.
  • Duct tape and scissors.
  • Towels and plastic sheeting.
  • A working telephone.

When to shelter in place

  • You will hear from the local police, emergency coordinators, or government on the radio and on television if you need to shelter-in -place.
  • If there is a “code red” or “severe” terror alert, you should pay attention to radio and television broadcasts to know right away whether a shelter-in-place alert is announced for your area.
  • If you are away from your shelter-in-place location when a chemical event occurs, follow the instructions of emergency coordinators to find the nearest shelter.
  • If your children are at school, they will be sheltered there. Unless you are instructed to do so, do not try to get to the school to bring your children home.

What to do

Act quickly and follow the instructions of your local emergency coordinators. Every situation can be different, so local emergency coordinators might have special instructions for you to follow.

In general, do the following:

  • Go inside as quickly as possible.
  • If there is time, shut and lock all outside doors and windows. Locking them may provide a tighter seal against the chemical.
    • Turn off the air conditioner or heater.
    • Turn off all fans.
    • Close the fireplace damper and any other place that air can come in from the outside.
  • Go in the shelter-in-place room and shut the door.
  • Tape plastic over any windows in the room.
    • Use duct tape around the windows and doors and make an unbroken seal.
    • Use the tape over any vents into the room and seal any electrical outlets or other openings.
  • If it is necessary to drink water, drink stored water, not water from the tap. Sink and toilet drain traps should have water in them (you can use the sink and toilet as you normally would).
  • Turn on the radio.
  • Keep a telephone close at hand, but don't use it unless there is a serious emergency.

Sheltering in this way should keep you safer than if you are outdoors. Most ly, you will be in the shelter for no more than a few hours. Listen to the radio for an announcement indicating that it is safe to leave the shelter.

After you come the shelter, emergency coordinators may have additional instructions on how to make the rest of the building safe again.

This fact sheet is the Center's For Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) best current information. It may be updated as new information becomes available.

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This page has been automatically translated from English. MSDH has not reviewed this translation and is not responsible for any inaccuracies.

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Источник: https://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/44,4802,122,218.html

Chemical Agents: Facts About Sheltering in Place

What does it mean to shelter in place?

Some kinds of chemical accidents or attacks may make going outdoors dangerous. Leaving the area might take too long or put you in harm’s way. In such a case it may be safer for you to stay indoors than to go outside.

“Shelter in place” means to make a shelter the place you are in. It is a way for you to make the building as safe as possible to protect yourself until help arrives. You should not try to shelter in a vehicle unless you have no other choice. Vehicles are not airtight enough to give you adequate protection from chemicals.

Every emergency is different and during any emergency people may have to evacuate or to shelter in place depending on where they live.

How to prepare to shelter in place

Choose a room in your house or apartment for the shelter. The best room to use for the shelter is a room with as few windows and doors as possible. A large room with a water supply is best—something a master bedroom that is connected to a bathroom.

For most chemical events, this room should be as high in the structure as possible to avoid vapors (gases) that sink.

This guideline is different from the sheltering-in-place technique used in tornadoes and other severe weather and for nuclear or radiological events, when the shelter should be low in the home.

You might not be at home if the need to shelter in place ever arises, but if you are at home, the following items, many of which you may already have, would be good to have in your shelter room:

  • First aid kit
  • Flashlight, battery-powered radio, and extra batteries for both
  • A working telephone
  • Food and bottled water. Store 1 gallon of water per person in plastic bottles as well as ready-to-eat foods that will keep without refrigeration in the shelter-in-place room. If you do not have bottled water, or if you run out, you can drink water from a toilet tank (not from a toilet bowl). Do not drink water from the tap.
  • Duct tape and scissors.
  • Towels and plastic sheeting. You may wish to cut your plastic sheeting to fit your windows and doors before any emergency occurs.

How to know if you need to shelter in place

Most ly you will only need to shelter for a few hours.

  • If there is a “code red” or “severe” terror alert, you should pay attention to radio and television broadcasts to know right away whether a shelter-in-place alert is announced for your area.
  • You will hear from the local police, emergency coordinators, or government on the radio and on television emergency broadcast system if you need to shelter in place.

How you can get more information about sheltering in place

You can contact one of the following:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protects people’s health and safety by preventing and controlling diseases and injuries; enhances health decisions by providing credible information on critical health issues; and promotes healthy living through strong partnerships with local, national, and international organizations.

Источник: https://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/shelteringfacts.asp

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