Highest — and lowest — property taxes in the US: Find out where your state stands

Top 10 Most Tax-Friendly States For Retirement | 2021

Highest — and lowest — property taxes in the US: Find out where your state stands

You want to focus on enjoying your retirement years, and there are a lot of factors that determine if this is a time of recreation and relaxation or not.

Good health, the ability to live independently, and to take part in engaging activities are all vital at this stage of life. Having enough money to live comfortably is necessary for pursuing your ideal retirement lifestyle.

While considering each state’s cost of living is essential, retiring to a tax-friendly state helps you to stretch your retirement income.

We analyzed multiple top tax-friendly state lists and looked in depth at each state’s income tax, average tax on purchases, gas tax, and whether or not there is an estate or inheritance tax. As a practical side note, in addition to altogether avoiding states with an estate tax, keeping all of your assets and financial accounts in a trust is a sound move for shielding heirs from this tax.

#1: Wyoming

  • State income tax: None
  • Average state and local sales tax: 4%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: 24 cents per gallon (national average is 32 cents per gallon)

Grand Tetons, WY. Source: Getty

With no state income tax, no estate tax, no inheritance tax, and a low sales tax, Wyoming is the clear winner as the most tax-friendly state.

Wyoming also rates high on the quality-of-life scale for other such as easy access to outdoor activities, top-ranked schools and clean air ratings. Wyoming has one of the lowest median property tax rates in the country.

A retiree with a home valued at $184,000 would pay $1,058 in property taxes, which is why we gave it the edge over Alaska. Most residents pay 0.58 percent of the home’s value.

In fact, Wyoming is ranked as the fourth best taxpayer state, and the state also ranks fourth overall in affordability for retirees in multiple publications.

#2: Alaska

  • State income tax: None
  • Average state and local sales tax: 0%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: $0.09 per gallon

Alaska is another state with no state income tax, and no estate tax or inheritance tax. It also has the second-lowest average state and local sales tax of 1.78 percent.

This serves to counter the median property tax, which is one of the highest in the country. A retiree with a $232,900 home in Alaska can expect to pay $2,422 in property taxes. Most residents pay 1.

04 percent of the property’s market value.

Alaska holds the top spot in WalletHub’s taxpayer ranking and also has the most elder-friendly work market for retirees who might want to earn extra income. The state has the highest percentage of workers who are 65 years old or older.

Anchorage, AK. Source: Getty

  • State income tax: None
  • Average state and local sales tax: 4.5%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: 22 cents per gallon

Mt Rushmore, SD. Source: Getty

South Dakota is another state with no state income tax, no estate or inheritance tax, and very low average state and local sales taxes, and is another great state for retirees.

The average homeowner pays 1.28 percent of their property’s value in taxes. Homeowners with a house valued at $126,200 will typically pay $1,620 a year property taxes. This lands the state right in the middle in the 27th place among the fifty states.

South Dakota is also another very elder-friendly work state and has the third highest percentage of workers who are 65 years old or older.

#4: Mississippi

  • State income tax: 3% on less than $5,000 of taxable income, 5% on more than $10,000
  • Average state and local sales tax: 7.07%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: 18.4 cents per gallon

Biloxi, MS. Source: Getty

Mississippi has no estate or inheritance tax.

The state income tax is very low, starting at 3 percent, and stands out as a great place for retirees for other non tax-related reasons such as low cost of living and its warm climate.

It has the fourth lowest median property tax rate in the U.S., which is an average of 0.52 percent. Taxes on the average home in Mississippi valued at $98,000 would be $508 a year.

The state also has the lowest adjusted cost of living in the country and the fourth lowest annual cost of in-home services.

#5: Florida

  • State income tax: None
  • Average state and local sales tax: 6%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: 36.59 cents per gallon

Florida has no state income tax, no estate or inheritance tax, and an average state and local sales tax of 6.66 percent. Regarding property taxes, it ranks 23rd in the nation. With a home valued at $182,400, a homeowner in Florida would pay $1,773 a year in property taxes. The average Floridian pays 0.97 percent in property taxes.

The state is quite popular with retirees. In fact, Florida stands out as being the state with the highest percentage of residents who are 65 years of age or older. The state is not an elderly-worker state with the fourth lowest percentage of senior workers in the country. However, this may be because the majority of the population of Florida retirees are not interested in working.

Ft. Lauderdale, FL. Source: Getty

  • State income tax: 3.07%
  • Average state and local sales tax: 6.34%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: No/Yes
  • Gas tax/fees: 76 cents per gallon

Fall In Philadelphia, PA. Source: Getty

Even though Pennsylvania’s tax on gas is the highest in the nation, there’s no estate tax in Pennsylvania. There’s a 3.07 percent state income tax, and an average state and local sales tax of 6.34 percent.

The state ranks seventh in property taxes, with an average 1.35 percent assessment. A property owner with a $164,700 house would pay roughly $2,223 a year in taxes. Finally, Pennsylvania has an inheritance tax of 4.

5 percent.

Pennsylvania is also prominent state for retirees. It has the has the fifth highest percentage of residents who are 65 years of age or older.

#7: Nevada

  • State income tax: None
  • Average state and local sales tax: 4.6%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: 24 cents per gallon

Reno, NV. Source: Getty

Nevada has no state income tax, and no estate or inheritance tax. The average state and local sales taxes are 7.98 percent. It’s in the middle of the pack – 24th in the U.S. – in property taxes. A Nevadan with a home valued at $207,600 would pay $1,749 each year in property taxes.

Nevada also has the fifth best taxpayer ranking by WalletHub.

#8: New Hampshire

  • State income tax: None
  • Average state and local sales tax: None
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: 24 cents per gallon

New Hampshire is a good state for retirees because residents don’t pay state income taxes, state and local sales taxes, and they don’t pay estate or inheritance taxes. The reason New Hampshire is not higher on our list is that it has the third highest property tax rates in the country. Residents pay an average 1.86 percent, and a homeowner would pay $4,636 for a home valued at $249,700.

New Hampshire also has the lowest property crime rate in the U.S.

Portsmouth, NH. Source: Getty

  • State income tax: 2% on less than $3,000 of taxable income, 6% on more than $75,000
  • Average state and local sales tax: 6%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: 26 cents per gallon

Lexington, KY. Source: Getty

Kentucky does not charge estate or inheritance taxes. However, move to this state, and you will pay other taxes. State income tax ranges from 2 percent to 6 percent, and the average state and local sales tax rate is 6 percent.

Kentucky also has the eighth lowest property tax rate in the country. A homeowner with a house valued at $120,200 would pay approximately $1,042 a year.

#10: Georgia

  • State income tax: 1% on the first $750 of taxable net income for single filers/$1,000 for those filing jointly, and 5.75% on taxable income over $7,000 for singles /$10,000 for those filing jointly
  • Average state and local sales tax: 4%
  • Estate tax/Inheritance tax: None
  • Gas tax/fees: 29 cents per gallon

Georgia has no estate tax and no inheritance tax. State income taxes are low, ranging from 1 percent to 6 percent, and the average state and local sales tax rate is 7.01 percent.

Georgia is ranked 33rd in the country for property taxes. Homeowners pay an average 0.83 percent, and the yearly tax would be $1,346 on a home valued at $162,800. However, retire to Georgia, and you won’t see many fellow retirees. The state has the fourth lowest percentage of residents who are 65 years of age or older.

Macon, GA. Source: Getty

Источник: https://www.retirementliving.com/top-10-most-tax-friendly-states

Which states have the highest and lowest property taxes?

Highest — and lowest — property taxes in the US: Find out where your state stands
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According to a new study from Owners.com the town of Virginia Beach in Virginia is the number one home buyer market in the country.

How much you pay in property taxes often comes down to which side of a county, city or district line you’re on. And if you’re a homebuyer this spring, it’s another important factor to consider while you house hunt.

Property taxes largely fund public schools but also other local services roads and police. A portion of your monthly mortgage payment goes to property taxes, so if you’re on a tight budget, a higher property tax bill could be onerous.

For instance, in Buffalo and Syracuse in New York, the property tax portion of the monthly bill can often be higher than the mortgage part because tax rates are so high there, says Lawrence Yun, the chief economist for the National Association of Realtors.

“Property tax is a critical piece of information in the home purchase decision and something a buyer should ask about before making the purchase,” Yun says.

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Property taxes are hyperlocal. Some states levy a property tax, but for the most part, these taxes are imposed on the county, city or district levels. That means a house down the street from yours could have a higher or lower tax burden than yours.

Why property taxes vary

In an extreme historical example, two nearly identical houses in the same subdivision that spanned the town line between Concord and Bow, New Hampshire, had vastly different property tax burdens, according to Joan Youngman, chair of the department of valuation and taxation at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, a think tank on the taxation and use of land. Concord’s property tax rate was about twice as much as Bow’s, even though both shared the same high school.

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Why was that? Because Bow’s biggest property taxpayer was a power plant, rather than its few residents. In Concord, the homeowners bore a bigger share of the tax burden. How much owners of commercial, industrial and utility properties pay in taxes can affect your rate.

Home values are another reason why one city has a higher property tax than another. Those areas with higher housing values can charge a lower tax rate, but still raise a lot in revenue.

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Take California and Ohio. In Ohio, the tax property rate is the 12th highest in the country at 1.56%. A median house in Ohio – valued at $129,900 – brings in $2,032 in property taxes. But in California, the tax rate is much lower at 0.81% – the 34th lowest in the U.S. – but the median home there (valued at $385,500) raises $3,104 in property taxes.

Other tax considerations

Property taxes aren’t the only tax burdens, either, that residents should consider, Youngman says. For instance, Bridgeport, Connecticut, has the highest property tax rate but no local sales or income taxes. Birmingham, Alabama, by contrast, has the 11th lowest property tax, but “a host other taxes,” she said.

“If you put those together, Birmingham's tax burden is actually higher than Bridgeport’s,” she said.

State property taxes

Overall, the effective property tax rate for homeowners is 1.2% in the U.S. On a median home of $178,600, that’s an annual tax bill of $2,149. Eighteen states have effective rates that are the same or higher than the U.S. rate, while 32 states and the District of Columbia have lower rates.

Using data from the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, USA TODAY ranked property taxes among states by the effective tax rate for homeowners, rather than the median tax paid, which is affected by overall home values. If your state doesn’t appear in the lists below, visit the Lincoln Institute’s online tool to find out where it stands.

New Jersey

Tax rate: 2.35%

Median home value: $315,900

Median tax paid: $7,410

Illinois

Tax rate: 2.3%

Median home value: $173,800

Median tax paid: $3,995

A city view of Manchester, New Hampshire. Residents of the state pay one of the highest property tax rates in the country. (Photo: Thinkstock)

New Hampshire

Tax rate: 2.15%

Median home value: $237,300

Median tax paid: $5,100

Connecticut

Tax rate: 1.97%

Median home value: $270,500

Median tax paid: $5,327

Wisconsin

Tax rate: 1.96%

Median home value: $165,800

Median tax paid: $3,248

A view of the Austin, Texas, skyline. Residents of the state pay one of the highest property tax rates in the country. (Photo: Shutterstock.com)

Texas

Tax rate: 1.9%

Median home value: $136,000

Median tax paid: $2,578

Nebraska

Tax rate: 1.85%

Median home value: $133,200

Median tax paid: $2,467

Michigan

Tax rate: 1.78%

Median home value: $122,400

Median tax paid: $2,174

A view of Latvia, Vermont. Residents of the state pay one of the highest property tax rates in the country. (Photo: KavalenkavaVolha / Getty Images)

Vermont

Tax rate: 1.74%

Median home value: $217,500

Median tax paid: $3,795

Rhode Island

Tax rate: 1.63%

Median home value: $238,000

Median tax paid: $3,884

Hawaii

Tax rate: 0.27%

Median home value: $515,300

Median tax paid: $1,406

Alabama

Tax rate: 0.43%

Median home value: $125,500

Median tax paid: $543

A street view of the French Quarter in New Orleans. Residents of the state pay one of the lowest property tax rates in the country. (Photo: Getty Images)

Louisiana

Tax rate: 0.49%

Median home value: $144,100

Median tax paid: $707

Delaware

Tax rate: 0.54%

Median home value: $231,500

Median tax paid: $1,243

Washington, D.C

Tax rate: 0.56%

Median home value: $475,800

Median tax paid: $2,665

A city view of Greenville, South Carolina. Residents of the state pay one of the lowest property tax rates in the country. (Photo: Thinkstock)

South Carolina

Tax rate: 0.57%

Median home value: $139,900

Median tax paid: $798

West Virginia

Tax rate: 0.58%

Median home value: $103,800

Median tax paid: $607

Colorado

Tax rate: 0.6%

Median home value: $247,800

Median tax paid: $1,489

A view of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Residents of the state pay one of the lowest property tax rates in the country. (Photo: hakkun / Wikimedia Commons)

Wyoming

Tax rate: 0.61%

Median home value: $194,800

Median tax paid: $1,196

Arkansas

Tax rate: 0.62%

Median home value: $111,400

Median tax paid: $693

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You’re going to need to bust open that piggy bank if you want to live in one of these pricey metro areas. Buzz60's Sean Dowling has more. Buzz60

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/05/20/property-taxes-state-which-has-highest-and-lowest/3697929002/

Connecticut Property Tax Calculator

Highest — and lowest — property taxes in the US: Find out where your state stands
Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Sean Pavone

On a nationwide scale, Connecticut homeowners pay the fourth highest property taxes in the U.S. The state’s average effective property tax rate is 2.14%, which is double the 1.07% national average.

Connecticut is unusual in that counties are not responsible for administering property taxes. Instead, cities and towns set rates and collect the taxes.

If you do not yet have a home in Connecticut, but are looking to purchase one, check out our guide to Connecticut mortgage rates and how to get a mortgage there before you make the move.

A financial advisor in Connecticut can help you understand how homeownership fits into your overall financial goals. Financial advisors can also help with investing and financial plans, including taxes, homeownership, retirement and more, to make sure you are preparing for the future.

How Connecticut Property Taxes Work

Cities and towns alone administer all property taxes in the state of Connecticut. While the state does have some oversight of the process, homeowners deal almost entirely with local officials.

The local municipality assigns assessors who valuate property to determine its fair market value. By law, this must happen at least once every five years, but assessments can be more frequent than that.

Once a property’s fair market value has been established, the statewide assessment ratio of 70% is applied. This means that a property’s assessed value is equal to 70% of its market value. The homeowner does not pay taxes on market value, but rather on the lower assessed value. For example, if your home is worth $500,000, the assessed value comes out to $350,000.

Connecticut Property Tax Rates

Municipalities in Connecticut apply property taxes in terms of mill rates. A mill rate is equal to $1 in taxes for every $1,000 in assessed value. To calculate your tax your mill rate, divide your assessed value by 1,000 and multiply the result by your mill rate.

In turn, a home with a market value of $500,000, and consequently a $350,000 assessed value and a mill rate of 50, would pay $17,500 in annual property taxes.

The table below shows the average effective property tax rates for each of Connecticut’s eight counties. An effective property tax rate is equal to taxes paid as a percentage of home value. The U.S. average effective property tax rate is 1.07%.

CountyMedian Home ValueMedian Annual Property Tax PaymentAverage Effective Property Tax Rate
Fairfield County$422,300$7,3931.75%
Hartford County$237,700$5,4302.28%
Litchfield County$251,500$4,8291.92%
Middlesex County$284,900$5,5651.95%
New Haven County$246,700$5,7442.33%
New London County$239,000$4,4251.85%
Tolland County$251,300$5,4582.17%
Windham County$198,000$3,6711.85%

Want to learn more about your mortgage payments? Check out our mortgage calculator.

Fairfield County

Fairfield County is the most populous county in the state of Connecticut. Major cities here include Fairfield, Bridgeport, Stamford and Norwalk. At a 1.75% average effective rate, property taxes in Fairfield County are lower than the 2.14% state average, but higher than the 1.07% national average.

If you have questions about how property taxes can affect your overall financial plans, a financial advisor in Stamford can help you out.

Hartford County

While homeowners in Hartford County pay less annually than those in Fairfield County, they actually face higher rates. The average effective property tax rate across Hartford County is 2.28%, which is well above the 2.14% state average.

In the city of Hartford, the mill rate is 74.29 mills. That's higher than many other nearby cities.

New Haven County

Effective property tax rates in New Haven are the highest in the state of Connecticut. The countywide average effective rate is 2.33%. This translates to a median annual property tax payment of $5,744, good for second-largest in the state.

The cities of New Haven and Waterbury are two of the most populous metropolises in New Haven County. In each of these cities, the millage rates are 43.88 mills and 60.21 mills, respectively.

New London County

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/enysarwar

Located in southeastern Connecticut along the East Coast, New London has some of the lowest property taxes on average of any Connecticut county. (Although, as mentioned above, municipalities, not counties, administer tax rates in Connecticut).

The average effective property tax rate in New London County is 1.85%. That's significantly lower than the state rate of 2.14%. Neither of these rates compare favorably to the national average property tax rate, though, which currently stands at 1.07%.

Litchfield County

Litchfield County residents pay a median property tax of $4,829 annually. That is lower than the state average ($6,004), although it's still well above the national average ($2,578). Effective property tax rates in Litchfield County are also above the national average, as they currently stand at 1.92%.

Middlesex County

Middlesex County is located in central Connecticut, south of Hartford. One of the largest cities in the county is Middletown, where the city millage rate is 35.80 mills. Including all municipalities in Middlesex County, the average effective property tax rate is 1.95%.

Tolland County

Tolland County is the second-smallest county in Connecticut by population. Homeowners in the county pay a median property tax bill of $5,458 annually. Tax rates, which municipalities determine, vary depending on where you live. For example, in Andover the rate is 35.61 mills. In Stafford, the rate is slightly lower at 34.93 mills.

Windham County

If you’re looking for low property tax rates in Connecticut, it might be a good idea to start your search in Windham County. The median property tax payment residents pay annually is $3,671, which is considerably cheaper than the $6,004 state median.

SmartAsset’s interactive map highlights the places across the country where property tax dollars are being spent most effectively. Zoom between states and the national map to see the counties getting the biggest bang for their property tax buck.

Methodology

Our study aims to find the places in the United States where people are getting the most value for their property tax dollars. To do this, we looked at property taxes paid, school rankings and the change in property values over a five-year period.

First, we used the number of households, median home value and average property tax rate to calculate a per capita property tax collected for each county.

As a way to measure the quality of schools, we analyzed the math and reading/language arts proficiencies for every school district in the country.

We created an average score for each district by looking at the scores for every school in that district, weighting it to account for the number of students in each school.

Within each state, we assigned every county a score between 1 and 10 (with 10 being the best) the average scores of the districts in each county.

Then, we calculated the change in property tax value in each county over a five-year period. Places where property values rose by the greatest amount indicated where consumers were motivated to buy homes, and a positive return on investment for homeowners in the community.

Finally, we calculated a property tax index, the criteria above. Counties with the highest scores were those where property tax dollars are going the furthest.

Sources: US Census Bureau 2018 American Community Survey, Department of Education

Источник: https://smartasset.com/taxes/connecticut-property-tax-calculator

States with the Lowest Taxes and the Highest Taxes

Highest — and lowest — property taxes in the US: Find out where your state stands

Where you live can help or hinder your ability to make ends meet. A myriad of taxes—property, license, state and local sales, property, inheritance, estate and excise taxes on gasoline—eat away at your disposable income. Weighing the tax landscape against your financial picture lets you stretch your dollars. Here's a roundup of the highest and lowest taxes by state.

“Location, location, location” is a focus that applies to more than just housing. Where you live can help or hinder your ability to make ends meet.

A myriad of taxes — such as property, license, state and local sales, inheritance, estate, and excise taxes — can eat away at your income. Often, the biggest tax ticket citizens face after paying the Internal Revenue Service is the one their state presents. As a result, identifying the states with the lowest taxes might be a smart financial move to make.

Currently, 41 states and the District of Columbia levy a personal income tax. Weighing the tax landscape against your financial picture could help you stretch your dollars further.

10 states with the highest personal income tax rates

A comparison of 2020 tax rates compiled by the Tax Foundation ranks California as the top taxer with a 12.3% rate, unless you make more than $1 million. Then, you have to pay 13.3% as the top rate. The additional tax on income earned above $1 million is the state's 1% mental health services tax.

The top 10 highest income tax states (or legal jurisdictions) for 2020 are:

  1. California 13.3%
  2. Hawaii 11%
  3. New Jersey 10.75%
  4. Oregon 9.9%
  5. Minnesota 9.85%
  6. District of Columbia 8.95%
  7. New York 8.82%
  8. Vermont 8.75%
  9. Iowa 8.53%
  10. Wisconsin 7.65%

Each of these states has a personal income tax floor, deductions, exemptions, credits, and varying definitions of taxable income that determine what a citizen actually pays.

10 states with the lowest personal income tax rates

Only seven states have no personal income tax:

  • Wyoming
  • Washington
  • Texas
  • South Dakota
  • Nevada
  • Florida
  • Alaska

In addition, Tennessee and New Hampshire limit their tax to interest and dividend income, not income from wages.

Among the states that tax income, Pennsylvania's 3.07% flat tax ranks the Keystone State as the 10th lowest in the nation for 2020.

Low personal income tax rates can be misleading; a lack of available tax deductions, for example, can raise the effective rate you pay.

The Retirement Living Information Center states that figuring your total tax burden, including sales and property taxes, can give you a more accurate reading on affordability, especially if you're on a fixed income.

However, these states with the lowest taxes on income can be a good place to start looking for a more affordable location.

States with the highest and lowest property taxes

Property tax falls under local, not state, jurisdiction. Median household property tax payments from analysis performed by the Tax Foundation — as a percentage of median household income from the Census Bureau's 2018 American Community Survey — cites these as the counties with the most expensive property tax:

  • Essex County, New Jersey 16.86%
  • Passaic County, New Jersey 14.62%
  • Union County, New Jersey 12.70%

These Louisiana parishes hold the least expensive spots for property tax as a percent of income:

  • Assumption Parish 0%
  • Vernon Parish 0.45%
  • Grant Parish 0.68%

Louisiana carries some of the lowest property tax rates as a percentage of earned income because it offers a homestead exemption. This law allows the first $7,500 of assessed property values to forego having property taxes levied against them.

For reference, assessed home values represent 1/10 of the home's actual value. For example, a $100,000 home would have a $10,000 assessed value. Therefore, Louisiana's homestead exemption allows the first $75,000 of home value not to count toward calculating your property tax bill, which goes a long way toward lowering the percentage of income that goes toward these taxes.

Sales tax takers and leavers

If you're a consumer, you'll want to consider that all but four states — Oregon, New Hampshire, Montana and Delaware — rely on sales tax for revenue. Alaska only levies a paltry 1.76% sales tax rate.

Of these, Alaska also has no income tax, thanks to the severance tax it levies on oil and natural gas production.

37 states, including sales-tax-free Alaska and Montana, allow local municipalities to impose a sales tax, which can add up.

Lake Providence, Louisiana has the dubious distinction of most expensive sales tax city in the country in 2020, with a combined state and city rate of 11.45%.

Factoring the combination of state and average local sales tax, the top five highest total sales tax states as ranked by the Tax Foundation for 2020 are:

  • Tennessee 9.55%
  • Arkansas 9.53%
  • Louisiana 9.52%
  • Washington 9.23%
  • Alabama 9.22%

Residents of these states pay the least in sales taxes overall:

  • Alaska 1.76%
  • Oregon 0%
  • Delaware 0%
  • Montana 0%
  • New Hampshire 0%

Combined sales and income tax leaders

The Tax Foundation interprets individual tax burden by what taxpayers actually spend in local and state taxes, rather than report these expenses from the state revenue perspective used by the Census Bureau. Its 2020 State and Local Tax Burden Rankings study reported that Americans paid an average rate of 9.9% in state and local taxes.

According to the foundation, the top five states with the highest state and local tax combinations are:

  • New York 12.7%
  • Connecticut 12.6%
  • New Jersey 12.2%
  • Illinois 11.0%
  • California and Wisconsin 11.0%

The same states have ranked as the top three consistently since 2005, according to the foundation.

Although taxes may not be the first thing you consider when deciding where to live, knowing the tax situations of the locations you're considering for a move could help you save in the long-run, especially when retiring.

Источник: https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tips/fun-facts/states-with-the-highest-and-lowest-taxes/L6HPAVqSF

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