Entrepreneurs tackle direct-to-consumer cookware made in America

The Five Things to Know in Your Sixth Year

Entrepreneurs tackle direct-to-consumer cookware made in America

If you’ve ever been brave enough to share your amazing new business idea with a friend or family member, you’ve undoubtedly been met with a hesitant head tilt and the start-up skeptic’s favorite refrain: You know, 50% of new businesses fail by their fifth year.

They mean well.They’re only worried about your wellbeing. But their lack of faith isn’ttotally unfounded. Making it the fifth year with your head still onstraight is a feat worth celebrating.

But making it the sixth year, now that’s a little morecomplicated. By year six, you’re a seasoned team that’s making its way scrappy start-up and into an established business.

You’ve figured out yourmarket, your product, and you’re rolling full speed ahead—that’s when the realtrouble begins.

Here are the five things you’llhave to figure out in your sixth year of business.

1. You’ll have to navigate a Big Problem

We went from asingle mattress in 2012 to an entire bedroom’s worth of products by 2017—and alarge portion of those products were launched in a 12-month period.

Scaling atthis speed can cause a lot of gaps in product quality, and other issues wehadn’t encountered previously. We saw this manifest in a few products, fromadhesive issues in our core mattresses to a stressful product recall.

We knewwe had a huge problem to tackle or risk the satisfaction of our customers.

At the height ofthese issues, our box foundation return rate was skyrocketing, and we couldn’tfigure out why. We had sourced the best of the best, we thought, but customersclearly didn’t agree.

A missed step in the feedback process between our CX andOps teams was preventing us from being about to get to the real issue—whichcost time, money, and worst of all, our customers’ trust.

It turned out, aftera lot of investigating, that the plastic pins used to hold our foundationtogether were breaking easily, creating a poor customer experience.

We asked our Superior Quality Manager, Garrison Mills, to weigh in on the takeaways from such a difficult to solve the problem. “You can have all of the data in the world, but it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t catch a trend soon enough.

After we experienced the wave of box foundation issues, we started creating internal, real-time dashboards to alert us the moment a defect began to trend upward.

This has been a big step forward for us in being able to react quickly to these issues when they come up.”

Additionally, we began building external-facing dashboards that, in some cases, were even better than the systems our vendors were using for their own quality management and assurance.

Many were hardcoding the weekly data we sent into their own QMS, which resulted in data-fidelity problems.

Creating external dashboards eliminated manual data entry by their teams and ensured that they were seeing exactly what we were seeing when we were seeing it.”

2. You’ll have to completely reconsider your strategy

What works in thefirst few years might start to shift once you’re a more established business.We’ve faced two major challenges that any brand can relate to, and we’re stillnavigating them as we learn.

Our competitive landscape rapidly changed. When we started, we were the first of just a few big names out there, but by our second and third years, there were dozens of copycat mattress-in-a-box companies on the internet.

We knew our product offering was unique, but the customer couldn’t see it through a sea of similar information and images.

We’ve had to constantly rethink how we present our products, and we’re still trying to get above the noise.

We also had to shift our retail strategy. We crafted a very hands-on experience with our product, including a personal guide in a private showroom. Customers would walk into our downtown Phoenix or San Francisco showrooms and wade through a thick crowd, just to be quoted a wait time.

We wanted to do things differently when it came to mattress shopping, but we realized the wait times to see our product were creating a worse experience, not a better one.

It took many iterations and customer feedback to hone in on our current experience, and we aren’t married to the way things have settled now, either.

Learning to beflexible, open to new ideas, and above all, open to customer feedback, is alesson that takes you from a two-year burnout to a 10-year veteran business.

3. You’ll underestimate yourself

When we launchedour Mint Mattress, our second mattress design, on Black Friday of 2017, weweren’t prepared for the reception we got. After forecasting, getting all ofour product assets together, and sending one simple email announcement, weplanned to sell about 500 units.

We sold 6,500 that weekendalone.

That sounds great news, right? What a success! But we were woefully unprepared for the backlog the demand for the Mint created with our manufacturers. Shipping was delayed, we

didn’t have theproduct itself back in stock until February of 2018, and our CX team was leftto answer a lot of (rightfully) upset customers.

We can’t say itwas the last time we underestimated our own products, but we learned a hugelesson—when you design a mattress specifically customer feedback aboutyour already popular mattress, be prepared for it to sell.

4. You’ll have to make painful decisions

At a certainpoint in your business, revisiting roles is important. No one ever wants to laypeople off, and we had successfully avoided it in our first five years.However, it became clear as we reorganized and grew that some roles had becomeredundant. Some people weren’t fulfilled by their job any longer, and someteams didn’t make sense, no matter how much we loved the people on them.

Handling a layoffor restructure requires a lot of empathy, a lot of transparency, and a lot ofpatience. It’s important to honor the work your team members have put in, butwhen the time comes, having those tough conversations is a vital move to takeyour company to the next stage.

5. You’ll make an expensive move that might not pan out

We’ll keep thisone brief for a lot of reasons, but there’s still a lesson to be learned here.In 2016, we got involved in dueling ad campaigns with a competitor. Things gotpretty heated, and soon we found ourselves in a lawsuit.

More importantly thanany legal significance, the end result didn’t have the impact we hoped for withour customers, the campaign seemed to be more interesting to industry insidersthan to consumers.

Sometimes, the move that feels right at the time isn’t onethat your customers care about in the end—maintaining their happiness is abetter long-term focus.

We’re cruisingahead toward that 10-year mark, and we’re excited to see what challenges weface in year eight, nine, and beyond. Tuft & Needle was founded to be oneof the 100-year companies that customers can’t stop talking about. We’ve madeour fair share of mistakes, but we always come away from them with a new lessonto apply to the next problem.

When your friend parrots that 50% statistic back to you, remember that there’s a reason half of businesses do make it beyond the five-year mark. Study their failures, let their successes inspire you, and if you’re executing on the right idea, you’ll stand the test of time.

Tuft & Needle is an American direct-to-consumer mattress and bedding brand owned by Serta Simmons Bedding. The company was founded on July 19, 2012 by Daehee Park and John-Thomas Marino in Phoenix, Arizona. 

Источник: https://phxstartupweek.com/the-five-things-to-know-in-your-sixth-year/

Best direct-to-consumer cookware for 2021: Made In, Caraway, Field Company and more

Entrepreneurs tackle direct-to-consumer cookware made in America

If you've ever painted a wall with a brush that's too small or assembled furniture with the wrong screwdriver, you know how important it is to have the right tools, and nowhere is that more apparent than in the kitchen.

If you're looking to upgrade your pots and pans or buy new cookware altogether, you may naturally gravitate towards consumer big name brands such as All-Clad, Anolon, Le Creuset and Cuisinart.

They're all great, but you could be saving some money and possibly getting a better fit for your specific cookware needs by checking out an emerging segment of the retail cookware scene: high-quality, direct-to-consumer cookware.

Direct-to-consumer products, including cookware, have seen a boom in the past several years. Whereas big retail brands previously had a stranglehold on the kitchen category, these spunky new DTC cookware companies offer new styles, surface materials and tailored cookware bundles, giving you more options than ever. 

There's a wide range of online-only cookware that can fit into any kitchen design, and most brands offer all of the cooking essentials — from a chef's knife and other kitchen tools to a stock pot, saucepan and nonstick cookware such as a nonstick skillet or nonstick pan.

You'll also find a sprawling selection of stainless steel pots, copper cookware and handy kitchen utensils, perfect for a home cook you.

Best of all, many are able to keep cookware quality high but prices low, which are two reasons as good as any to give direct-to-consumer cookware a serious look.

Read more: The best seafood delivery services to catch for 2021

How is direct-to-consumer cookware different?

It's natural to think that less expensive cookware is inherently lower quality, but that's not necessarily the case with direct-to-consumer cookware.

Much of the cost of traditional cookware is added throughout the distribution process.

Products pass through the hands of resellers, distributors and retailers, all of whom add a markup to the base price in order to make money.

By the time any cookware lands in a store, the price has increased dramatically, and you end up paying a lot more than what the manufacturing costs were. That's where direct-to-consumer companies come in.

These cookware brands skip the typical distribution chain, bypassing the middlemen and selling straight to customers instead. This typically means you have to buy their products online, but the upside is you're getting the same high-quality goods for your cooking without the added costs, a difference which you can use to actually buy food to cook. What's not to love about that?

So are you ready to shop? Take a look through your pantry for inspiration and get ready for some amazing kitchenware. Here are the eight best direct-to-consumer cookware brands you might want to welcome into your kitchen, which we update periodically.

Made In

Made In is a popular cookware startup based in Austin, Texas, and one of our absolute favorite kitchen and cookware brands — not just within the DTC category.

The company has taken notes from some of the best brands All-Clad and uses only premium materials and high-end manufacturers from around the world — which you can absolutely feel when you pick it up.

Un some of those other brands, Made In keeps prices on its luxury cookware relatively low by avoiding resale, distributor and retail markups.

What does it offer in terms of cookware? Made In has a line of stainless steel cookware including stainless steel cookware sets, as well as a smaller collection of blue carbon steel cookware which is ideal for high heat cooking (e.g. meats). Made In also has great nonstick and regular frying pans in a wide range of sizes, stockpots, sauté pans, sauciers, woks and universal lids. 

Beyond pots and pans, Made In also offers a variety of high-end kitchen knives, including chef's knives, paring knives and more. Many of the products (including the pots and pans in their The Starter Kit) have a lifetime warranty. You can purchase items individually or in sets, but some of the more popular items are sold out, so you'll want to get on the waitlist.

The brand is constantly adding new and interesting pieces to the collection this carbon steel paella pan and a camping-inspired grill frying pan, both released this year.

Caraway

The argument for ceramic cookware is that it's both nonstick and non-toxic. With Caraway's modern design and playful color palettes, it's pretty darn attractive too. I've personally used these pans and they get significantly hotter and hold heat better than other traditional nonstick surfaces.

If you sear a lot of steaks, chicken, pork chops and burgers but don't love clunky cast iron or hard-to-clean stainless, this is a perfect pick. We're also digging the smart storage racks that come with each seven-piece cookware set as the pots and pans drawer often devolves into serious chaos and clutter.

 

Caraway cookware can only be purchased as a complete set, which includes a 10.5-inch fry pan, 3-quart saucepan with lid, 6.5-quart Dutch oven, 4.5-quart sauté pan and four magnetic pan racks and canvas lid holder with hooks.

Potluck

One of our favorite up-and-coming cookware brands is Potluck, which launched in 2018 and is dedicated to bringing professional-quality kitchen tools to home cooks at affordable prices. Its high-quality cookware is made in the same factories as other high-end brands, but priced significantly lower, thanks to the direct-to-consumer business model.

Potluck sells a variety of full kitchen sets, including a seven-piece essential cookware set ($160), three-piece knife set ($60) and a striking kitchen tool set with all the things you forgot to get for $80.

You can also buy the full line — a 22-piece stainless steel cookware set of kitchen essentials — for under $300. The cookware pieces — which include 1.

5- and 3-quart saucepans, a 10-inch skillet, an 8-quart stockpot and three lids — are stainless steel, and the knives are stamped from high-carbon steel. 

Field Company

Lighter cast-iron cookware? I'm listening. Cast-iron cookware is a favorite among home cooks, and the Field Company has given classic cast iron a modern update.

The American-made cast-iron skillets are lighter and smoother than the ones your parents used to cook in, but the pans are every bit as long-lasting and versatile.

If you're new to cast iron, know that few other cookware materials get and stay as hot, so if you want a tight sear on your steaks and burgers or crispy crust on your breakfast potatoes, you need to get yourself some cast iron and fast.

Read more: What Is the difference between a Dutch oven and cast iron?

The Field Company offers five different cast-iron skillet sizes, ranging from 6.75 inches all the way up to an enormous 13-inch frying pan (you probably don't need one that big FYI).

You can buy them individually or in sets, and there are a number of accessories available, as well.

These cast-iron skillets have hundreds of great reviews citing how Field Company's cookware is all well-made and worth the investment.

Food52

This cookware brand is an offshoot of food website Food52 and sources much of its design and product innovation from actual chefs. That means it's user-friendly with lots of clever detail, but it all looks pretty great too.

Five Two sells full cookware sets as well as individual pieces, including stainless steel and nonstick.

There's also tons of gadgets, accessories and tableware to choose from, this handsome roasting pan or these nifty silicone spoons, making it a great place to turn if you just need a piece here or there or want to add some accessories to your collection.

Brigade Kitchen

If you're partial to stainless steel cookware, you'll love the stainless pots and pans from Brigade Kitchen. It offers four core cookware products, called The Hardware, that are made from premium materials and are ideal for home cooks in smaller households. (If you frequently cook for five or more people, this stainless steel pan set might not be big enough for you, sadly.)

The lineup from Brigade Kitchen includes a stainless steel skillet, saucepan and sauté pan, all of which are naturally nonstick and designed for fast and even heating.

The cookware brand offers a 60-day trial period with free returns, but the stellar reviews, we don't think you'll need to take the company up on that offer.

People swear these perfectly sized stainless steel pans perform flawlessly and are easy to clean.

Sardel

Founded by three brothers, this stainless steel cookware has drawn the praise of big-name chefs Bobby Flay. It has a simple, streamlined design similar to All-Clad's, and uses five-ply construction other high-end stainless steel cookware but at a more approachable price tag.

All the Sardel cookware is made in Italy and the direct-to-consumer brand sells a range of fry pans, saucepans and stockpots starting at just $80. Or you can snag the entire eight-piece set for $495, which includes a nonstick fry pan in addition to the stainless steel wares.

Milo

No kitchen is complete without a Dutch oven, and if you don't want to shell out big bucks for storied French brands, one of the best is Milo.

This consumer cookware brand offers high-end enameled cast iron cookware, including two Dutch oven sizes, but the prices are less than half of what you'd pay for other popular brands.

And if you're still balking at the price, remember that a good dutch oven can also double as bakeware and make delicious baked goods.

Milo sells a 5.5-quart Dutch oven, as well as a smaller 3.5-quart model. Both sizes come in either white or black enamel, and they're dishwasher- and oven-safe up to 500 degrees. Plus, Milo products come with a lifetime guarantee, and reviewers say the quality is unbeatable given the affordable price.

More kitchen recommendations

This article was originally written for Chowhound by Camryn Rabideau and updated by David Watsky. 

Kitchen and Household Cuisinart “,”author”:null,”date_published”:”2021-01-28T19:48:00.000Z”,”lead_image_url”:”https://www.cnet.com/a/img/vx6cBruT09MbWPA4W41RY87A3gM=/1200×630/2021/01/28/c24338eb-6760-4d5b-86e3-b16f45f8a56b/caraway-cookware.jpg”,”dek”:null,”next_page_url”:null,”url”:”https://www.cnet.com/home/kitchen-and-household/best-direct-to-consumer-cookware/”,”domain”:”www.cnet.com”,”excerpt”:”Cut out the middleman with these online-only brands for high-quality, stylish cookware at lower prices.”,”word_count”:1640,”direction”:”ltr”,”total_pages”:1,”rendered_pages”:1}

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/home/kitchen-and-household/best-direct-to-consumer-cookware/

Best direct-to-consumer cookware for 2021: made in, caraway, field business and more

Entrepreneurs tackle direct-to-consumer cookware made in America

If you've ever painted a wall with a paintbrush that Furniture is too small or assembled with the wrong screwdriver, you know how important it is to have the right tools, and Nowhere is this more evident than in the kitchen.

If you're looking to upgrade your pots and pans or buy new cookware, you can naturally turn to big consumer brands All-Clad, Anolon, Le Creuset, and Cuisinart.

They're all great, but you could save money and possibly better meet your specific cookware needs by checking out an emerging segment of the retail kitchen utensils scene : High quality cookware intended direct to the consumer.

Direct to the consumer the products, includingincluding kitchen utensils, have experienced a boom in recent years. While major retail brands previously had a stranglehold on the kitchen category, these new DTC cookware companies are bringing new styles, surface materials and custom cookware sets to you. offering more options than ever.

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There is a wide range of kitchen tools online that will only fit into any kitchen design, and most brands offer all the kitchen essentials – from a chef's knife and the .

cooking utensils to a pot, saucepan and nonstick cooking utensils such as a nonstick skillet or a nonstick skillet. also find a wide selectionection of stainless steel pots, copper cookware and handy cooking utensils, perfect for a home cook you.

Better yet, many are able to maintain the quality of cookware at a high level but at low prices, which are two reasons to give a serious look to cookware intended for direct consumption.

Find out more: The best livery serving seafood to catch for 2021

How do kitchen utensils destined directly for the consumer different?

It's natural to think that cheaper cookware is inherently inferior in quality, but that's not necessarily the case with cookware that goes straight to the consumer.

A greatpart of the cost of traditional cooking utensils is added throughout the distribution process.

The products pass through the hands of resellers, distributors and retailers, all of whom add a markup to the base price in order to make money.

By the time a cookware arrives in a store, the price has gone up dramatically and you end up paying a lot more than the cost of manufacturing. This is where businesses that reach directly to consumers come in.

These cookware brands ignore the typical distribution chain, bypassing middlemen and selling direct to customers. This usually means that you have to buy their products online, but the advantage is that you get the same high quality products for your kitchenwithout the additional costs, a difference that you can use to buy food to cook. What 's not to love about it?

So, are you ready to shop? Take a look at your pantry for inspiration and get ready for some amazing kitchen utensils. Here are the top eight direct-to-consumer cookware brands that you might want to welcome into your kitchen, which we update regularly.

Fait In

Made In is a popular cookware startup Austin , Texas, and one of our favorite kitchen and cookware brands , not just in the DTC category.

The company has taken notes from some of the top brands All-Clad and only uses top quality materials and high-end manufacturers from all over the world – which you can absolutely feel when you do. Take.

Un some of these other brands, Made In keeps the prices of its luxury cookware relatively low by avoiding resale, distribution and retail margins.

What's in it? he in terms of utensilsof the kitchen? Made In offers a range of stainless steel cookware, including stainless steel cookware, as well as a smaller collection of blue carbon steel cookware, ideal for cooking at. high temperature (eg meats). Made In also offers excellent non-stick and regular frying pans in a wide range of sizes, pots, saute pans, saucers, woks and universal lids.

Beyond pots and pans, Made In also offers a variety of premium kitchen knives, including chef's knives, paring knives and more. Many products (including the pots and pans in their starter kit) have a lifetime warranty. You can purchase items individually or in sets, but some of the more popular items are sold out, so you'll want to get on the waitlist.

The brandconstantly adding new and interesting pieces to the collection this carbon steel paella pan and a data component camping inspired frying pan , both released this year.

See Made In Caraway

The point of ceramic cookware is that they are both non-stick and non-toxic. With Caraway 's modern design and paddles in playful colors, it 's damn attractive too. I have personally used these pans and they get much hotter and hold betterheat than other traditional non-stick surfaces.

If you sear a lot of steak, chicken, pork chops, and burgers, but don't clunky cast iron or hard-to-clean stainless steel, this is a perfect choice.

We also dig out the smart storage racks that come with each seven piece cookware set pots and pans the drawer often turns into a serious chaos and mess.

Caraway cookware can only be purchased as a complete set, which includes 10.5 inch frying pan, 3 liter saucepan with lid, 6 Dutch oven , 5 liter, 4.5 liter saute pan and four magnetic pot racks and canvas lid support with hooks.

395 $ at Verishop Potluck

One of our favorite burgeoning cookware brands is Potluck, which was launched in 2018 and is dedicated to bringing professional grade cookware to home cooks in affordable prices. Its high-quality cookware is made in the same factories as other premium brands, but at a significantly lower price, thanks to the direct-to-consumer business model.

Potluck sells a variety of complete kitchen sets, including a seven essential cookware set (160 $), set of three knives ($ 60) and one kitchen tool set with everything you forgot to ' get $ 80.

You can also purchase the full line – 22 piece stainless steel cookware set from kitchen essentials – for under $ 300. Cooking utensils – which include 1.

5 and 3 quart pots , 10 inch skillet, 8 quart pot, and three lids – are stainless steel and the knives are stamped high carbon steel.

See at Potluck Field Company

Find out more: What is the difference between a Dutch oven and cast iron?

The Field Company offers five different sizes of cast iron skillet, ranging from 6.75 inches up to a massive 13 inch skillet (you probably don't need a pan). such a big FYI).

You can buy them individually or in sets , and there are a number of accessories also available.

These cast iron stoves have hundreds of great reviews explaining how the Field Company cookware is all well made and worth the investment.

See at Field Company Food52

This brand of kitchen utensils is an offshoot of the Food52 food website and derives much of its design and product innovation from real chefs. This means that she is conviviale with lots of smart details, but it all looks great too.

Five Two sells Complete kitchen utensils as well as individual pieces, including stainless steel and non-stick.

You also have tons of gadgets, accessories, and tableware to choose from, this handsome rotisserie or these nifty silicone spoons , making this a great place to turn if you just need to of a piece here or there or if you want to add accessories to your collection.

See at Food52 Brigade Kitchen

If you have a weakness for kitchen utensilsstainless steel sine, you will love the stainless steel pots and pans from Brigade Kitchen.

She offers four basic cookware sets, call ed The Hardware, which are made from premium materials and are ideal for home cooks in small households.

(If you cook for five or more people frequently, this stainless steel pot set might not be big enough for you, unfortunately.)

The Brigade Kitchen range includes a stainless steel stove , sauc epan and saute pan , all naturally non-stick and designed for rapid and even heating.

The kitchenware brand offers a 60-day trial period with free returns, but the great reviews, we don't think you should accept this offer by the company.

People swear that these perfectly sized stainless steel pans work perfectly and are easy to clean.

See at Brigade Kitchen Sardel

Founded by three brothers, this stainless steel cookware set has drawn praise from top chefs Bobby Flay. It has a simple, clean design similar to All-Clad's, and uses a five-layer construction other high-end stainless steel cookware, but at a more affordable price.

All kitchenware fromSardel kitchens are made in Italy and the direct-to-consumer brand sells a line of frying pans, pots and pans starting at just $ 80. Or you can snag the eight-piece set for $ 495, which includes a non-stick frying pan in addition to the stainless steel merchandise.

See at Sardel Milo

No kitchen is complete without Cocotte, and if you don't want to shell out large sums for reputable French brands , one of the best is Milo.

This brand of kitchen utensils Mainstream Kitchen offers premium enameled cast iron cookware, including two Dutch oven sizes, but the prices are less than half of what you would pay at its popular brands.

are always hesitant about the price, remember that a good Dutch oven can also serve as a baking dish and make delicious pastries.

Milo sells a 5.5 liter Dutch oven, as well as a smaller 3.5 quart model. Both sizes are available in white or black enamel and are dishwasher and oven safe up to 500 degrees. Plus, Milo products come with a lifetime warranty, and reviewers say the quality is unbeatable for the affordability.

See Milo

Other recommendations from kitchen

This article was originally written for Chowhound by Camryn Rabideau and put updated by David Watsky.

Источник: https://www.hebergementwebs.com/appliances/best-direct-to-consumer-cookware-for-2021-made-in-caraway-field-business-and-more

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