AI at work: Acquiring job skills needed to thrive in a new era

The Workplace Skills That Will Survive The AI Revolution

AI at work: Acquiring job skills needed to thrive in a new era

They say the board game Go is more complex than chess. Apparently, the number of possible moves is greater than the number of atoms in the universe.

If that’s enough to make you feel a little light-headed, then it should only make the achievements of the Go masters – who are somehow capable of selecting moves and strategies of startling brilliance from a well of seemingly infinite possibilities – all the more incredible.

The grandmaster of these Go masters is Lee Sedol, who is revered as the game’s equivalent to Michael Jordan. It came as a major shock then, when in 2016, over a five-game series, Sedol was comprehensively outmaneuvered, out-thought, and outplayed by a new master. A Google-developed AI program named AlphaGo.

In China, sixty million people tuned in to see the contest between man and machine, with millions more joining around the world online. They watched as Sedol lost the series 4-1. The defeat was so overwhelming that one analyst admitted feeling physically unwell watching the world’s greatest human Go player being dismantled so easily by a “ruthlessly efficient algorithm”.

The result sent shockwaves around the world, moving the s of Henry Kissinger to weigh in on the worrying implications of tech’s unassailable progress. He wondered what the future held for AI such as AlphaGo and AlphaZero (a similarly relentless chess-playing program):

“On its own, in just a few hours of self-play, it achieved a level of skill that took human beings 1,500 years to attain. Only the basic rules of the game were provided to AlphaZero. Neither human beings nor human-generated data were part of its process of self-learning. If AlphaZero was able to achieve this mastery so rapidly, where will AI be in five years?”

He also wondered what this future might look for humans.

Rise of the robots

Even if countless sci-fi thrillers down the years have overplayed the conceit of a robot apocalypse, they still appear to be at least pointing toward a partial truth.

Some commentators, such as Kissinger, suggest that the rise of AI will pose ethical questions we may not be equipped to answer. Others speculate that it may change how we think about the world, or even question what it means to be human.

What’s clear is that speculation about AI is fast becoming fact.

Artificial or automated intelligence is today being used in medicine, travel, advertising, finance, and even politics. It is set to soon spread into aspects of all major industries too, with considerable knock-on effects.

Most prominent among these is the impact AI is forecast to have on the labor market.

The global management consulting firm McKinsey & Company predict that by 2030, 375 million workers – roughly 14 percent of the global workforce – may need to switch occupation. The authors of the report are quick to put this in context, reminding readers that the orders of magnitude here are akin to the shift from agriculture to manufacturing.

By 2030, 375 million workers – roughly 14 percent of the global workforce – may need to switch occupation as a result of automation. Click To Tweet

Because AI can process information, recognize patterns, and solve complex problems far more quickly than humans can, experts believe that the most at-risk roles most are those involving repetitive tasks, number crunching, and basic literacy. As a result, it’s estimated that the demand for basic cognitive skills such as data input or word processing will fall by 19 percent in the US and 23 percent in Europe.

But where one door closes another opens. Tech is designed to boost productivity rather than reduce employment. Since AI is continuously learning and always improving, the surest way to stay ahead of the curve for humans is to follow suit and do the same.

In anticipation of this, two-thirds of executives say they’ll need to replace or retrain over a quarter of their workforce within the next five years.

But while technical and coding skills are currently among the most sought after by hiring managers, the demand for soft skills is increasing dramatically. In the same McKinsey & Company report mentioned above, it’s estimated that the demand for social and emotional skills will grow across all industries by 26 percent in the US and 22 percent in Europe.

Coding skills are the most sought after by hiring managers, but with the rise of AI soft skills such as creativity and emotional intelligence have increased in value.

This shouldn’t come as much of a surprise: even though AI can perform complex calculations and analyses, soft skills are far more difficult to replicate in a machine, something that Matthew Bishop, the senior editor at The Economist, acknowledged at the World Economic Forum in Davos earlier in the year:

“AI is going to have a really big impact on jobs that are essentially about pattern recognition, looking at data and seeing trends and predicting the future. They’re not in jobs that involve elements of judgment and creativity.”

Automation: An opportunity, not a threat

Yet predictions don’t always tally with real-world progress. Though the demand for soft skills in the workplace will almost certainly intensify, the starting point for meeting that demand will be a cultural shift in which companies provide a pipeline of continuous learning opportunities for employees who are ready to take advantage of them.

Higher-order cognitive skills such as creativity and critical thinking will see a 19 percent increase in demand in the US and a 23 percent increase in Europe. Click To Tweet

If they can do so successfully, the projected benefits for both companies and employees are considerable, with increased productivity, higher wages, and greater overall prosperity among the potential gains.

Somewhat counterintuitively, industry experts believe that AI’s integration into the workforce will be essential in the transition to greater worker mobility. As more rote jobs become automated, newer, more skilled positions will appear to replace them – and these will only be suitable for humans.

“Workers, for their part, have to be strategic and aim for the jobs least ly to be overtaken by robots or other machines,” wrote academics Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee for the BBC.

“They have to commit to a lifetime of practicing and updating their skills by, for example, taking extra courses online and in classrooms.

The answer to the new and growing workforce of robots is not to slow the pace of technological progress, but to speed up our institutions so that entrepreneurs, managers and workers a can thrive.”

Assessing human evolution

And enabling this professional growth is technology.

According to LinkedIn’s Global Recruitment Trends 2017, more talent acquisition leaders are turning their attention to soft skills assessment as a means of improving their hiring and training strategies. In fact, 35 percent of the hiring managers surveyed earmarked soft skills assessment as a top priority.

The reasons behind this are pretty clear: if implemented effectively, soft skills assessment technology can not only identify skills gaps that need to be addressed but can offer actionable insights into employees’ overall continuous learning progression.

An additional benefit is that digital assessments can also minimize the risk of hiring bias, thereby increasing workplace diversity. The roll-on effect of this is not just equal opportunity, but an escalation of ideas, innovation, and, ultimately, revenue.

The workplace skills that are always in demand

While AlphaGo’s victory over Lee Sedol was a good indicator of AI’s staggering processing power as well as its dawning capacities for self learning, it is still a poor reflection of the true status quo between artificial and human intelligence.

More talent acquisition leaders are turning their attention to soft skills assessment as a means of improving their hiring and training strategies. Click To Tweet

You could even say that the chips are stacked heavily in favor of the latter when we shift the compass to measure other capabilities that are crucial to the workplace.

Adaptability

The human brain is capable of affecting desired outcomes even when the circumstances aren’t particularly compliant to them. For instance, most people would prefer to avoid adversity, but they are, by and large, capable of dealing with and even thriving in it.

Hundreds of thousands of years of evolution have taught us to be resilient in the face of difficulty and persistent in finding ways to overcome it – both of which are essential abilities in a business environment.

Whether it’s selectively learning new skills, or experimenting with different strategies, humans have an enormous capacity for coping with change when they need to.

Critical thinking

Technology would never have advanced along its current trajectory were it not for humans continuously solving problems along the way. Though we may often choose the path of least resistance, the brain enjoys solving problems and is capable of both objective and subjective analysis.

As Kissinger wrote in The Atlantic, “AI is ly to win any game assigned to it. But for our purposes as humans, the games are not only about winning; they are about thinking.”

Creativity

Part of the reason why the human brain is so adept at critical thinking is its imaginative capacity.

While machines outperform us in technical and tactical applications, the human brain is more adept at setting goals and generating creative strategies to achieve them.

Because creativity involves novelty and value, it also requires contextual and cultural understanding – something that current AI struggles to contend with.

Emotional intelligence

An important function of imaginative thought is empathy, which acts as a connective tissue between ourselves and others.

It’s this ability to empathize that allows us to manage complex relationships, coach others, and get the best from those we work with.

Because these functions are outside the scope of machines, they are increasingly sought after by companies looking to recruit leaders or team mentors.

Communication

Good communication is another cornerstone of effective teamwork. Whether working on a big project, attempting to understand someone else’s point of view, asking for assistance, or expressing an idea, human interaction is central to work culture.

This makes it all the more important to develop skills for listening, as well as speaking or writing. If internal communications are problematic, then public-facing communications are ly to be poor too, which will affect public perception in addition to team morale.

As social beings, communication with others is at the core of many of our most meaningful experiences.

Источник: https://learnosity.com/workplace-skills-that-will-survive-the-ai-revolution/

The Skills You Need to Thrive in the Era of AI As a Marketer

AI at work: Acquiring job skills needed to thrive in a new era

As with any transformative technology, AI has marketing professionals on their toes; leaving them to wonder where the fate of their jobs lie. Should you have to worry and anticipate a massive disruption of AI threatening the security of your job? asks, Alice Oh, Digital Marketing, Specialist at MarketPro

Artificial intelligence has been a trending topic for quite some time now, which comes as no surprise as the use of it is on the rise in every industry.

According to a report by Salesforce, 51% of marketing leaders today state that they currently use AI in some scope, with 27% planning to start using it over the next two years.

As it continues to grow, it will progressively impact how our society functions and transform the way we work as marketers.

As with any transformative technology, AI has marketing professionals on their toes; leaving them to wonder where the fate of their jobs lie in the era of AI. So, should you have to worry and anticipate a massive disruption of AI threatening the security of your job?

Marketers – have no fear. AI isn’t going to replace you or any of your colleagues just yet… Well most of them, at least. The truth is, that even though AI technology is incredibly advanced (and intelligent), it is not sophisticated enough to completely take over and master the combination of human IQ and EQ.

We haven’t experienced the full potential of AI yet. But as the power of AI comes to fruition, it needs the support of humans and drives the need for marketers to build up their expertise.

While it may replace a few routine and mundane marketing functions that don’t require much intellect or skill, it will create new roles and transform the role of the modern marketing expert into something quite exciting.

Here’s how to embrace the future of marketing with AI and ramp up your skills to evolve right alongside it.

Embrace and Accept AI with Open Arms

In order to develop skills suited to support AI, you must first accept and understand the current and potential use cases of it.

AI is particularly helpful when it comes to automating repetitive tasks and sorting through massive amounts of data.

From analyzing which type of content resonates with a specific audience persona to curating the content all on its own, AI is incredibly proficient in providing deep insights into the consumer and optimizing workflows.

By automating so much redundant work, AI gives you the opportunity to craft more sophisticated strategies and prioritize your time on tasks that make a meaningful impact.

The best way to “survive” the AI shift is to embrace its strengths and how they compliment your own capabilities as a marketer. By understanding the limitations and possibilities of AI, you can better understand how it’s going to impact (and enhance) your work.

Video: Artificial Intelligence for People in a Hurry

AI technology makes marketing tasks significantly more efficient and enhances data-driven decision making. Marketers are now better able to identify their target consumer and understand their needs and wants never before.

Big data – also known as massive amounts of data that are quite impossible for any human to process – is something AI is well-equipped to manage and sort through. It serves marketers with meaningful actions and insights, pattern predictions, and highlights valuable relationships that may not have been discoverable by the human mind.

However, the data that AI delivers needs to be translated by a human for proper result. In order to do so, you must be able to understand analytics and interpret the outputs to drive meaningful connections and actions. Making these connections allows you to understand the consumer, their behavior and motivation to better serve them and meet their needs.

You Can’t Put a Price on Human Emotional Intelligence

The continuous integration of AI into the customer-centric world impacts how consumers interact with and purchase from brands. This type of technology continuously drives customer demands and expectations higher, forcing marketers to deliver better experiences than ever before.

AI is able to provide social insights that allow you to deliver messages across various channels customer behavior. However, it falls short in the emotional capacity needed to genuinely connect with consumers.

It lacks the competence in understanding the context of certain scenarios that occur along the customer journey.

Different factors location and culture significantly impact the journey and experience, most of which are possible for only humans to inherently understand.

The empathy and emotional intelligence (EQ) you have as a human allows you to better understand the consumer and tailor content for a highly personalized journey and experience.

A combination of sophisticated analytical skills and EQ empowers you to leverage AI in targeting your core customer in ways that weren’t possible just a few years ago.

Unparalleled Creativity Cannot Be Simulated

As you and I know, we expect more from a brand than just a great product or service nowadays. We want to connect with the company, and expect nothing short of an incredible and seamless buying experience from them. This is essentially what makes us return and go back for more.

The customer should always be at the heart of marketing. From the design of the product to the messaging to the customer service, everything should revolve around the brand’s consumers.

AI drives new, cutting-edge ways to do marketing and ways to share brand stories. And there is simply nothing that can connect to the emotions and feelings of a human better than another human. This is where the unparalleled creativity of humans is incomparable to any machine or technology.

AI allows you to have more free time to focus on creative work and other tasks machines don’t have the ability to do. If you have a unique, creative mindset to compliment sharp technical skills, your level of competence is unmatched to any transformative technology.

Lifelong Learning Is a Must to Survive

AI and other disruptive technologies will decrease the amount of efforts and time spent on day-to-day tasks. But it can never replace the human touch successful marketing requires.

In the midst of constant transformation and developments in the tech space, marketers who are able to continuously learn, expand their skills, and evolve quickly alongside technology will always be able to survive.

We predict AI will always need human input in order to maximize its value. Picking up technical skills is particularly valuable in order to get ahead. Doing so will help you “speak the language” of AI and deliver even more value as a marketer.

We also predict that AI will continue evolving very quickly, and its impact on marketing as we know it will be absolutely profound. The ability to constantly evolve and grow will help you adapt to future breakthrough developments – which are inevitable in the digital landscape.

The best marketers of the future will use innovative technologies to enhance their skills and results they drive for their employers, not replace them.

As you and I know, we expect more from a brand than just a great product or service nowadays. We want to connect with the company, and expect nothing short of an incredible and seamless buying experience from them. This is essentially what makes us return and go back for more.

The customer should always be at the heart of marketing. From the design of the product to the messaging to the customer service, everything should revolve around the brand’s consumers.

AI drives new, cutting-edge ways to do marketing and ways to share brand stories. And there is simply nothing that can connect to the emotions and feelings of a human better than another human. This is where the unparalleled creativity of humans is incomparable to any machine or technology.

AI allows you to have more free time to focus on creative work and other tasks machines don’t have the ability to do. If you have a unique, creative mindset to compliment sharp technical skills, your level of competence is unmatched to any transformative technology.

How To Reskill Your Employees For The AI Era

AI at work: Acquiring job skills needed to thrive in a new era

by Sarah Tierney

LONDON – Implementing AI is a journey for your organisation. Not just from your perspective but also for your employees. After all, these are the people who will be hands-on with the technology every day.

You can have all the beneficial AI tools in the world, but without employee buy-in, you won’t succeed.

“AI is not technology that solely sits within the IT team. We all have the ability to learn and it is important we look to democratise AI across our business” –  Louise O’Shea, CEO, Confused.com

Set your teams up for success

It’s not just their buy-in that you need, either. Your employees also need access to training so they can reskill themselves for the AI era. They can’t reap the benefits of AI if they’re not confident in how to use it.

With a growing digital skills gap, it’s never been more important to have training plans in place for your employees. 65 percent of today’s students will be going into jobs that don’t even exist yet.

Not only does this mean businesses need to invest in their digital talent pipeline, but it also shows the importance of reskilling existing employees.

It’s important they’re equipped with the confidence and skills to collaborate with new technologies and evolve their jobs.

“Traditionally, people have learned in education and then entered the workplace. AI will significantly change this as the pace of development means we must constantly adapt and learn throughout our lives.” – Ian Fordham, Chief Learning and Skills Officer, Microsoft UK

It’s not only your employees who will benefit, either. Reskilling is beneficial for your organisation too.

70 percent of employees were more ly to stay at their job if they had training and development opportunities.

An organisation with a great training and development programme is more ly to retain their employees, attract the right talent. They’re also more ly to be collaborative, productive, and innovative.

What skills are needed?

79 percent of UK leaders say it’s worth investing in reskilling their current workforce. Yet, only 28 percent of employees are actively learning new skills to keep up with the changes AI bring.

When thinking about the future of work, thoughts tend to go straight to those digital skills. We need to understand how to use these emerging technological advances and prepare ourselves for the ones that don’t exist yet.

AI will give us more time to be more ‘human’ – where soft skills such as innovation, creativity, problem-solving, and analytical thinking reign supreme. So, whilst we all need to invest in technical training, developing our soft skills is also becoming increasingly important.

Organisations that have a culture of learning and collaboration, where employees have the technical knowledge and the opportunity to take risks, tend to outperform those who don’t by 10 percent.

No one left behind

Even when you look at AI as an additional tool to the workplace, it will change the nature of job roles. While this can be a great thing, it does mean that, according to the World Economic Forum (WEF), 54 percent of employees will need significant re- and upskilling.

Think of your AI journey as a train – you don’t want to leave anyone behind at the station. Don’t just focus on a select number of your employees, or those in high-performing or high-value roles. Make sure all your staff are included.

 The WEF reports that only 33 percent of organisations will prioritise at-risk employees, whereas over 41 percent will focus on high-performing employees. Basically, those most in need of re-skilling are least ly to receive this training.

The organisations that will thrive are the ones who build a culture that supports continuous learning, investing time, and resources into really getting to grips with what workers need to evolve alongside AI.

Align your employee’s objectives, not only on KPIs, but also on learning digital skills and developing soft skills. Skills curiosity, innovation, and agility.

Embed an inclusive culture of learning and development into your organisation’s values. Those organisations that will succeed will be those whose employees improve and collaborate with technology and each other, rather than compete.

Join Microsoft and 20,000 other industry and technology leaders at The AI Summit London, June 11 – 12. Find out more

Sarah Tierney is a Digital Storyteller for Microsoft UK

Источник: https://www.aibusiness.com/document.asp?doc_id=760917

Jobs of the Future: Artificial Intelligence

AI at work: Acquiring job skills needed to thrive in a new era

  • Artificial intelligence will transform the global economy, and AI jobs are in high demand.
  • Getting an education in AI is challenging and requires persistence and personal initiative.

  • AI careers are future-proof, meaning they are ly to survive well into the future.

Artificial intelligence (AI) promises to deliver some of the most significant and disruptive innovations of this century.

Self-driving cars, robotic assistants, and automated disease diagnosis are all products of an emerging AI revolution that will reshape how we live and work.

And with demand for talented engineers more than doubling in the last few years, there are limitless opportunities for professionals who want to work on the cutting edge of AI research and development.

While jobs designing and improving AI applications are growing, some analysts predict these efforts will disrupt economic activity in a big way. This is because AI systems can process unfathomable amounts of data, and human beings — meaning potentially millions of people in today's job market — simply aren't up to the task.

AI will be a great transformer, improving the efficiency of many sectors … and enabling the creation of higher-value services that can lead to overall economic growth.

— Dan Ayoub, General Manager of Mixed Reality Education at Microsoft

One recent report by the McKinsey Global Institute suggests that around one-third of the American workforce will need to switch occupations by 2030. Workers in data-heavy industries are especially vulnerable, including financial and administrative professionals, legal support staff, sales clerks, and IT workers.

More cautious industry observers point out that it's unclear what jobs may be lost and how many more will be created. The World Economic Forum, for example, predicts AI may lead to a net increase of 58 million jobs globally.

No matter what the new AI economy means for the future workforce, college students and young professionals stand to benefit from entering this burgeoning field.

But breaking into artificial intelligence isn't as simple as learning computer science or earning a college degree. It takes initiative, guts, and know-how to engineer a career in AI.

In fact, more than half of senior AI professionals report there is a skills gap in the recruitment of new scientists — a veritable “talent crisis,” according to an Ernst & Young report.

Getting an AI Education: Intelligence Required

AI has a high learning curve, but for motivated students, the rewards of an AI career far outweigh the investment of time and energy.

Succeeding in the field usually requires a bachelor's degree in computer science or a related discipline such as mathematics. More senior positions may require a master's or Ph.D.

, though a college degree is no longer considered a hard requirement by top employers Apple and Google. Regardless, your success will depend largely on factors outside a formal education.

Curiosity, confidence, and perseverance are good traits for any student looking to break into an emerging field, and AI is no exception.

— Dan Ayoub, General Manager of Mixed Reality Education at Microsoft

“Curiosity, confidence, and perseverance are good traits for any student looking to break into an emerging field, and AI is no exception,” said Dan Ayoub, general manager for mixed reality education at Microsoft.

Ayoub is a seasoned AI professional and agreed to talk to BestColleges about how to land a job in the field.

“Un careers where a path has been laid over decades, AI is still in its infancy, which means you may have to form your own path and get creative.”

What Ayoub means is that there is no standard artificial intelligence degree or curriculum. Some universities may not offer a prescribed set of courses for a major or specialization in AI, while those with dedicated AI programs may have unique approaches to the discipline.

“Because AI is still an emerging field … universities differ in how specialized a degree you may be able to get,” Ayoub said.

“A good place to start is computer science coursework, getting familiar with the basics of data science, machine learning, and Java.

… There are a number of new undergraduate and graduate programs popping up every day that are designed to prepare someone specifically to work in AI.”

Artificial Intelligence Courses and Curriculum

As the table below demonstrates, AI consists of several overlapping disciplines. Understanding statistical methods, for example, is just as important as a background in computer science. In addition to the subjects listed here, it can be helpful to take interdisciplinary courses in areas cognitive science to provide a conceptual framework for AI applications.

Sample Core Subjects in an AI Curriculum

Math and Statistics Computer Science AI Core Subjects
  • Linear Algebra
  • Differential and Integral Calculus
  • Matrices and Linear Transformations
  • Integration and Approximation
  • Modern Regression
  • Probability Theory
  • Bayesian Networking
  • Probabilistic Graphical Models
  • Computer Systems and Programming
  • Principles of Imperative Computation
  • Principles of Functional Programming
  • Data Science Essentials
  • Parallel and Sequential Data Structures and Algorithms
  • Logic Programming and Computational Logic
  • Agile Software Development
  • Machine Learning, Deep Learning, and Reinforcement Learning
  • Information Theory, Inference, and Learning Algorithms
  • Neural Networks for Machine Learning
  • AI Representation and Problem-Solving
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Computer Vision and Image Analysis
Sources: Carnegie Mellon University; Stanford University; Northwestern University; Learning Artificial Intelligence; Microsoft Professional Program

Once you master some of the fundamentals, find the AI subfields that most interest you and shape your coursework accordingly. The next table shows more specialized subjects you might take as electives while earning a degree; these topics are also worth exploring at any stage of your career. Additional classes may be available that teach students specific AI applications in fields biology, healthcare, and neuroscience.

Sample Artificial Intelligence Clusters and Subjects

Machine Learning Decision-Making and Robotics Perception and Language Human-AI Interaction
  • Deep Reinforcement Learning and Control
  • Applied Machine Learning
  • Machine Learning for Text Mining
  • Advanced Data Analysis
  • Neural Computation
  • Autonomous Agents
  • Cognitive Robotics
  • Strategic Reasoning for AI
  • Robot Kinematics and Dynamics
  • Information Retrieval and Search Engines
  • Speech Processing
  • Computational Perception
  • Computational Photography
  • Vision Sensors
  • Designing Human -Centered Systems
  • Human-Robot Interaction
  • Robotic Manipulation
  • Safe and Interactive Robots
Sources: Carnegie Mellon University; Stanford University

Whether you're a college student or already in the workforce, it's important to proactively define your own AI curriculum. As Ayoub explained, “schools Carnegie Mellon, Stanford, and MIT are just a few that have built out tracks for those wanting to work in AI, but there are many others. There are also supplemental programs that can help someone who is midcareer retrain to move into a job in AI.”

For example, Microsoft recently announced an AI track for the Microsoft Professional Program, which is part of a larger effort that includes the developer-focused AI School.

The programs are available online to anyone and, according to Ayoub, provide “job-ready skills and real-world experience to engineers and others who are looking to improve their skills in AI and data science through a series of online courses that feature hands-on labs and expert instructors.”

Machine learning courses and related resources are also available from Google, MIT, Stanford, CalTech, and the University of Cambridge. With soaring demand, universities and big-name companies are eager to provide educational content that can help increase the supply of AI engineers.

Landing a Job in AI: It's About Initiative

When it comes to the best jobs for the future, few industries stand out as much as artificial intelligence. A 2019 report from Gartner shows that enterprise applications for AI have grown 270% in four years, fueling a level of demand that outstrips the current supply of qualified job candidates.

This is great news for professionals seeking machine learning jobs and related careers in artificial intelligence. The number of industries using AI is also expanding to the point where virtually no major enterprise will be untouched by this rapidly unfolding technology revolution.

Most In-Demand Artificial Intelligence Jobs

Occupation Percentage Growth (2015-2019)
Machine Learning Engineer344%
Robotics Engineer128%
Computer Vision Engineer116%
Data Scientist78%
Source: Indeed

While job prospects are bright, it's up to individual students and professionals to define their career trajectories and acquire the necessary skills and knowledge. Success depends in part on your personal initiative in learning integral AI subjects and networking with the right people. From there, internship and job opportunities are sure to follow.

Companies hiring in AI include not only the usual suspects — namely, Google, Amazon, and Apple — but also a host of startup artificial intelligence companies specializing in niche industries. When you're ready to apply for jobs, there are a few ways you can get started:

“LinkedIn is a powerful tool to make connections with thought leaders in AI and learn more about their perspectives,” Ayoub said. “Following leaders in the field will give you a strong understanding of where potential career opportunities might exist. … If your university doesn’t have a specialized track for AI, you may find that AI is part of other tech or computer science events.”

Ayoub also suggests that reviewing individual job postings on LinkedIn will give you an idea of the types of roles available and the skills required.

This is especially important given the variety of languages, tools, and frameworks needed for artificial intelligence jobs.

While not an exhaustive list, below are some examples of skills that can help candidates check off all the right boxes in a job posting.

  • Programming Languages: Python, Java, C/C++, SQL, R, Scala, Perl
  • Machine Learning Frameworks: TensorFlow, Theano, Caffe, PyTorch, Keras, MXNET
  • Cloud Platforms: AWS, Azure, GCP
  • Workflow Management Systems: Airflow, Luigi, Pinball
  • Big Data Tools: Spark, HBase, Kafka, HDFS, Hive, Hadoop, MapReduce, Pig
  • Natural Language Processing Tools: spaCy, NLTK

It's equally important to put these skills to the test — and to acquire new ones — by starting personal projects.

For example, without a machine learning portfolio in your GitHub to show potential employers, it would be difficult to demonstrate your expertise and interest in AI.

Fortunately, you can participate in any number of hackathons, coding challenges, robotics competitions, and open source projects to sharpen your abilities.

While these requirements might seem daunting at first, don't be discouraged. Artificial intelligence is a mansion with many rooms, and it can take time and patience to develop the expertise and specializations necessary to succeed. More than anything, jobs of the future simply require a willingness to stay curious and step into the unknown.

“Today’s college students are entering the workforce amidst a digital revolution, so my advice is to be bold in forming your own path,” concluded Ayoub.

“The potential of AI to improve our quality of life and efficiency is endless, but the opportunities may not present themselves as clearly as other career fields.

Stay committed and dream big, and you may be a great leader and innovator of the digital age.”

Additional AI Resources

Last Updated: May 14, 2020

Источник: https://www.bestcolleges.com/blog/future-proof-industries-artificial-intelligence/

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