A guide to the new COVID-19 testing rules for travel to the US

COVID-19 and Your Health

A guide to the new COVID-19 testing rules for travel to the US

Testing and International Air Travel

New Travel Requirements:

All air passengers coming to the United States, including U.S. citizens, are required to have a negative COVID-19 test result or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before they board a flight to the United States. See the Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.

Air travel requires spending time in security lines and airport terminals, which can bring you in close contact with other people and frequently touched surfaces.

Social distancing is difficult in busy airports and on crowded flights, and sitting within 6 feet of others, sometimes for hours, may increase your risk of getting COVID-19.

How you get to and from the airport, such as with public transportation and ridesharing, can also increase your chances of being exposed to the virus.

Testing before and after travel can reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19. Testing does not eliminate all risk, but when paired with a period of staying at home and everyday precautions wearing masks and social distancing, it can make travel safer by reducing spread on planes, in airports, and at destinations.

Here’s what to know:

  • Plan ahead: Make sure you understand and follow all airline and destination requirements related to travel, testing, or quarantine, which may differ from U.S. requirements. If you do not follow your destination’s requirements, you may be denied entry and required to return to the United States.
  • All air passengers coming to the United States, including U.S. citizens, are required to have a negative COVID-19 test result or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before boarding a flight to the United States.
    • Make sure that you will be able to get a test at your destination before your return to the United States. Always check and follow state and local recommendations or requirements related to travel in addition to federal requirements.
  • Get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before you travel. Keep a copy of your test results with you during travel in case you are asked for them. Check and follow destination testing requirements—they may require specific types of tests.
    • Don’t travel if you test positive; immediately isolate yourself and follow public health recommendations
    • Delay your travel if you are waiting for test results.
  • Get tested 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for 7 days after travel.
    • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.
    • If you don’t get tested, it’s safest to stay home for 10 days after travel.
  • If you are eligible, get fully vaccinated for COVID-19. Wait 2 weeks after getting your second vaccine dose to travel—it takes time for your body to build protection after any vaccination.

Plan Ahead

Check if your airline or destination requires any health information, testing, or other documents. Some destinations require testing before travel and/or after arrival.

If you do not follow your destination’s requirements, you may be denied entry and required to return to the United States. You may have to pay any related airline fees.

If you test positive at your destination, you might be required to isolate. You might be delayed from returning to the United States as scheduled.

Information about testing requirements for your destination may be available from the Office of Foreign Affairs or Ministry of Health, or the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Country Information webpageexternal icon.

Take steps to reduce higher-risk activities for 14 days before your trip and get tested 1-3 days before you travel. Testing before travel could help reduce the chance that your travel will be interrupted or delayed by COVID-19.

Get Tested Before Your Flight

Below is what you need to know about getting tested before your international flight.

  • Get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before your trip and again no more than 3 days before your return flight to the United States departs.
  • Make sure you get your test results before you travel. If you are waiting for results, delay your travel.
  • Do not travel if your test result is positive; immediately isolate yourself, and follow public health recommendations.
  • A negative test does not mean that you were not exposed or that you will not develop COVID-19. Make sure to wear a mask, avoid crowds, stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from others, wash your hands, and watch your health for signs of illness while traveling.
  • Keep a copy of your test results with you during travel. You may be asked for them.
    • Check your destination’s testing requirements before you depart—they may require specific types of tests. If you do not follow your destination’s requirements, you may be denied entry and required to return to the United States.

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Get Tested and Stay Home After Travel

  • Get tested with a viral test 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days after travel.
    • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.
    • If your test is positive, isolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.
  • If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness for 14 days, whether you get tested or not.

Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements after travel.

Also, take these actions after you return from travel to protect others from getting COVID-19:

  • Avoid crowds and stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from anyone who did not travel with you. It’s important to do this everywhere — both indoors and outdoors.
  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth when in public settings. Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.
  • If there are people in the household who did not travel with you, wear a mask and ask everyone in the household to wear masks in shared spaces inside your home for 14 days after travel.
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness.
  • Watch your health: Look for symptoms of COVID-19.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Where do I get tested?

Visit your state, territorial, tribal and localexternal icon health department’s website to look for the latest information on where to get tested.

When do I need to get a test to travel to the United States and what kind of test do I need?

Get tested no more than 3 days before your flight to the United States departs. Make sure to be tested with a viral test (NAAT or antigen test) to determine if you are currently infected with COVID-19. Also, make sure that you receive your results before your flight departs and have documentation of your results to show the airline.

Do state and local governments in the United States have separate testing requirements for air passengers?

Federal testing requirements must be met to board a plane to the United States. Some state and local governments may have similar or more restrictive testing requirements for air passengers arriving in their jurisdictions. Always check and follow state and local recommendations or requirements related to travel in addition to federal requirements.

Where can I get a test overseas?

For information on where to obtain a test overseas, travelers should review the relevant U.S. Embassy websiteexternal icon. Travelers may need to consider a routing change to a different country or city in order to meet the testing requirement.

Do international destinations have testing requirements for air passengers?

Plan ahead and check for any health information, testing, or other documentation required by your airline or destination. Many countries have testing requirements and only accept specific types of tests. If you do not follow your destination’s requirements, you may be denied entry and required to return to the United States. You may have to pay any related airline fees.

What if I have had a COVID-19 vaccine or have tested positive for antibodies? Do I still need a negative COVID-19 test or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 to enter the United States?

Yes, at this time all air passengers traveling to the United States, regardless of vaccination or antibody status, are required to provide a negative COVID-19 test result or documentation of recovery.

What else should I do before I travel to protect myself and others from COVID-19?

For 14 days before you travel, take everyday precautions wearing masks, social distancing, and handwashing, and avoid the following activities that put you at higher risk for COVID-19:

  • Going to a large social gathering  a wedding, funeral, or party.
  • Attending a mass gathering a sporting event, concert, or parade.
  • Being in crowds in restaurants, bars, fitness centers, or movie theaters.
  • Taking public transportation planes, trains or buses or being in transportation hubs airports.
  • Traveling on a cruise ship or river boat.

Is one test enough to prevent spread during my travel?

CDC recommends getting tested 1-3 days before your flight AND 3-5 days after your trip AND stay home and self-quarantine for 7 days.

Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days. If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days.

Getting tested in combination with staying home significantly reduces travelers’ risk of spreading COVID-19.

What if I recently recovered from COVID-19?

CDC does not recommend getting tested again in the 3 months after a positive viral test, as long as you do not have symptoms of COVID-19.

If you have had a positive viral test in the past 3 months, and you have met the criteria to end isolation, travel with a copy of your positive test result and a letter from your doctor or health department that states you have been cleared for travel.

You will need to show this documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before you board a flight to the United States.

Источник: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/testing-air-travel.html

COVID-19 travel restrictions by state: See testing, quarantine requirements

A guide to the new COVID-19 testing rules for travel to the US
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The CDC has warned against traveling during the COVID-19 pandemic, but here are some ways to get you safely to new destinations. USA TODAY

The U.S. is still setting new COVID-19 death records, even as vaccines are rolling out across the country. The U.S. has surpassed more than 25 million cases.

Many states are still imposing stay-at-home orders and travel restrictions.

Some states are discouraging interstate travel by requiring or recommending that visitors and residents returning from other states quarantine. Others allow visitors to present a recent, negative coronavirus test in lieu of the quarantine. A few also require travelers to fill out health questionnaires when they arrive.

Some counties or municipalities have issued similar advice to travelers, so anyone looking to go on a road trip or take a vacation should check government websites for their destination and anywhere they plan to stop overnight. 

If you are still deciding whether to travel, check USA TODAY's updated list to see what restrictions are in place at your destination.

Resource guide: What you need to know about coronavirus and COVID-19

Travelers headed for Aspen or anywhere in Pitkin County longer than 24 hours must complete an online affidavit and provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test administered within the last 72 hours.

If test results are pending at the time of arrival, the visitor must quarantine until it comes back. A negative test and affidavit are required for anyone age 10 and up; parents must sign one for minor children.

Travelers who do not get tested must quarantine for 10 days.

The policy applies to full and part-time residents, including people who own vacation properties in the area. Failure to comply may result in a $5,000 fine. 

More information: https://covid19.pitkincounty.com/travel-affidavit/

Connecticut 

According to a Dec. 18 executive order from Gov. Ned Lamont, anyone traveling into Connecticut from a state other than New York, New Jersey or Rhode Island must quarantine for 10 days or provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test from within the last 72 hours.

Visitors must also fill out an online travel health form upon arrival in Connecticut. 

The restriction also applies to anyone who has traveled outside the United States. It does not apply to travelers who spend less than 24 hours in Connecticut.

More information: https://portal.ct.gov/Coronavirus/Travel

Hawaii 

All travelers must complete a form through the state's Safe Travels site.

Visitors ages 5 and up who want to bypass the mandatory 10-day quarantine must have a negative COVID-19 test result from one of the state's trusted testing partners taken within 72 hours of the final leg of their trip.

If results aren't available before boarding the final leg of the trip, travelers must quarantine for 10 days or the length of the stay.

As of Jan. 12, there is no exemption in place for individuals who have been vaccinated, though Lt. Gov. Josh Green, who oversees the state's travel policy, indicated that policy may change once enough people have received both doses.

Check the county websites for any islands you plan to visit, as some, including Kauai and the Big Island, have their own entry requirements.

Kauai travel rules change – again:  Island begins its own entry program Jan. 6

More information: https://hawaiicovid19.com/travel

Tourists entering Chicago from states designated as orange needs a negative COVID test no older than 72 hours before arrival or quarantine for 10 days or the duration of their trip, whichever is shorter. Check the city's website to see how your state is categorized.

More information: https://www.chicago.gov/city/en/sites/covid-19/home/emergency-travel-order.html

Kansas

Anyone who has traveled to a gathering out-of-state with 500 people or more where people did not socially distance or wear masks and those who have been on a cruise ship or river cruise on or after March 15 must quarantine.

Those travelers who have no symptoms can test out on day six and leave quarantine on day 8 if the result is negative.

If a visitor required to quarantine has no symptoms after day 10, they are allowed to leave quarantine on day 11, though a full 14 days of quarantine is recommended.

More information: https://www.coronavirus.kdheks.gov/175/Travel-Exposure-Related-Isolation-Quaran

Kentucky

The Kentucky Department for Public Health continues to discourage all out-of-state leisure travel and urges those who do travel to self-quarantine for 14 days.

More information: https://govstatus.egov.com/ky-travel-advisory

Maine

Out-of-state visitors have the choice to complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Maine or obtain a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival in Maine. New Hampshire and Vermont residents are exempt.

More information: https://www.maine.gov/covid19/

Maryland 

Incoming visitors or returning residents must either obtain a negative test result or self-quarantine for 10 days, according to Gov. Larry Hogan's emergency order. The penalty for knowingly violating the order is one year in prison and/or a fine of $5,000.

More information: https://covidlink.maryland.gov/content/faqs/#faqHoliday

Visitors and returning residents are required to complete the Massachusetts Travel form, though visitors from states designated as low risk by the state department of health are exempt.

A 10-day quarantine is also required unless an individual has a negative result from a COVID-19 test administered no earlier than 72 hours before arrival.

 Travelers who fail to quarantine may be fined $500 a day.

More information: https://www.mass.gov/info-details/covid-19-travel-order

Minnesota

Travelers and residents returning from out-of-state travel, are asked to quarantine for 14 days after they arrive.

More information: https://www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/coronavirus/prevention.html#travel

New Hampshire 

Visitors and returning residents who have been outside of  New England for nonessential travel must quarantine for 10 days upon arrival. Travelers from Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island are exempt. Travelers who get a negative PCR test result on or after day 7 of that period may end their quarantine.   

More information: https://www.covidguidance.nh.gov/out-state-visitors

New Jersey

New Jersey recommends visitors or people returning from states other than New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Delaware to quarantine for 10 days. If travelers to the state test test negative, they should still quarantine for a full 7 days after travel. 

In addition, the state is asking travelers to complete a voluntary online questionnaire. The advisory does not apply to people spending fewer than 24 hours in New Jersey.

More information: https://covid19.nj.gov/travel

New Mexico 

Travelers coming from a high-risk state must quarantine for 14 days or the duration of their stay. High-risk states are specified on the state's COVID-19 website.

There are several exemptions: airline workers, public safety or public health workers, military personnel and their dependents, federal employees, federal defense contract workers, first responders and health care workers.

More information: https://cv.nmhealth.org/travel-recommendations

New York 

With the exception of essential workers and those coming from contiguous states, all travelers who leave the state for more than 24 hours must quarantine for 10 days.

Affected travelers can opt to “test out” of quarantine by submitting a negative coronavirus test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival, quarantine for three days and get another test on day four.

Providing that result is negative, the traveler may exit quarantine. 

Travelers who go state for less than 24 hours do not need to quarantine but must get a coronavirus test on the fourth day following their return.

All travelers must continue to fill out the state travel form upon arrival.

More information: https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/covid-19-travel-advisory

Ohio 

Travelers entering Ohio from a state with a testing positivity rate of 15% or higher are advised to quarantine for 14 days.

More information: https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/families-and-individuals/COVID-19-Travel-Advisory/COVID-19-Travel-Advisory

Oregon

Travelers arriving from other states or countries are urged to quarantine for 14 days upon entering the state, and residents are urged to avoid nonessential out-of-state travel.

More information: https://traveloregon.com/travel-alerts/#covid

Pennsylvania 

Visitors and returning residents who enter Pennsylvania from another state must have a negative COVID-19 test taken either within 72 hours prior to entering Pennsylvania. Travelers over age 11 who do not get tested must quarantine for 10 days or until receipt of a negative test result.

More information: https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/coronavirus/Pages/Travelers.aspx

Rhode Island

Anyone coming to Rhode Island from a state with a positivity rate higher than 5% is required to quarantine for 14 days unless they can provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of arrival, though the testing exception is not available to international travelers. 

More information: https://covid.ri.gov/protect-your-household/travel-tofrom-ri

https://www.traveltexas.com/plan-a-trip/travel-safely-across-texas/

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Experts weigh in on how safe outdoor activities are during the coronavirus pandemic. USA TODAY

Vermont

All travelers entering or returning to Vermont must quarantine for 14 days. The only exception is essential travel. Travelers can end quarantine early if they haven't had any symptoms of COVID-19 and get a PCR test on or after day 7 with a negative test result.

Vaccine policy: If you are fully vaccinated, and it has been 14 days since you got your final vaccine dose, you will not have to quarantine upon arrival in Vermont.

More information: https://www.healthvermont.gov/covid-19/travel-quarantine/visitors-vermont

Washington

In addition to the current travel advisory recommending that visitors and returning residents quarantine for 14 days, Gov. Jay Inslee has also implemented a new 14-day quarantine requirement for anyone who has been to the United Kingdom or South Africa or any other country where the new variant of the virus is rampant.

The state also advises visitors to check the website for the county they plan to visit in case there are any additional restrictions.

More information: https://coronavirus.wa.gov/travelers-commuters

Washington, D.C.

Anyone traveling from a state with more than 10 cases per 100,000 people must get a coronavirus test no more than 72 hours prior to traveling.

Visitors from Maryland and Virginia are exempt, as are people visiting for family emergencies or funerals. Anyone spending less than 24 hours in the District does not need to take a test.

Visitors who are in Washington for more than three days should get tested within three to five days of arrival. 

More information: https://washington.org/dc-information/coronavirus-travel-update-washington-dc

Contributing: Curtis Tate

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A Guide to the New Covid-19 Testing Rules for Travel to the U.S

A guide to the new COVID-19 testing rules for travel to the US

Travelers flying to the U.S. from abroad now have to show proof of negative Covid-19 tests before boarding their flight.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said preflight testing is necessary as Covid-19 cases continue to soar and more-contagious strains of the virus emerge around the world. President Biden signed an executive order on Jan.

21 affirming the new testing requirements and directing agencies to consider additional travel-safety measures.

Here is what you need to know about the new protocols before you take a trip.

The order applies to everyone traveling to the U.S. on international flights, including U.S. citizens. You will need to show negative test results even if you are flying on a private jet or charter flight. There are exceptions for children under age 2, airline crews and federal law-enforcement agents and members of the military traveling for duty.

What countries are covered?

All of them. Passengers need to show proof of a negative test when traveling to the U.S. from any country, including Mexico and the Caribbean.

The CDC won’t be granting any temporary waivers for countries where testing capacity is lacking, as it had originally planned: “With the U.S.

already in surge status, the testing requirement for all air passengers will help slow the spread of the virus as we work to vaccinate the American public,” the agency said.

The universal testing requirement went into effect Jan. 26. People arriving from the U.K. had already been subject to similar testing requirements that went into effect in December, following the emergence of a new coronavirus strain there.

Airline executives have said they expect some short-term hiccups as the new policy goes into effect but say they believe testing will help restore confidence in travel in the long run.

United Airlines Holdings Inc.

, for example, has said it is working with partners to increase the supply of tests in places Mexico, where the new requirements have put a damper on appetite for trips to beach resorts.

“We are going to work really, really hard to make sure it’s really, really easy to travel with United even with the new testing requirements,” Toby Enqvist, United’s chief customer officer, said.

What kind of test will I need, and when? What happens if I don’t have my results?

U.S.-bound air travelers must get tested no more than three days before flying and bring written or electronic proof of the results. Airlines can accept both PCR and rapid antigen tests. The CDC has said home diagnostic kits that are analyzed in a lab should qualify, if the kits have been approved by national health authorities.

If you don’t have the documentation with you, airlines won’t allow you to board, according to the CDC’s order.

Finding a test is your responsibility, and lack of supply won’t be an excuse. The rules are strict, and exceptions will be rare. The CDC says passengers who can’t find tests in the country they are flying from might need to arrange to travel to a second country to be tested before heading to the U.S. Embassies also won’t be providing tests, the State Department says.

Hotels and resorts are starting to offer tests on-site, and airlines are also looking to help customers find out where to get tested. United is adding information about local testing options to a digital hub on its website and app.

In the coming weeks and months, United said its customers will be able to use that tool to book tests at sites around the world. Delta Air Lines Inc. DAL 1.

38% has also launched a website where customers can find approved testing sites in cities where the airline flies.

To streamline the verification process, airlines including United and American Airlines Group Inc. AAL 0.70% are launching health passports where passengers can upload documents such as negative Covid-19 test results.

What if my test is positive?

If you test positive for Covid-19 while you are abroad, get ready to extend your trip. Some carriers have said they will let passengers rebook only after 14 days, and will require proof of recovery.

Government officials are warning travelers to think through how to handle work and child care if this happens. The costs of finding a place to stay and obtaining medical care will fall to you.

Some hotels and resorts are offering complimentary space to quarantine, but make sure to check.

“If you cannot easily access a Covid-19 test or if you test positive, you will end up overseas for much longer than you planned,” said Ian Brownlee, acting assistant secretary of the State Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs. “All travelers should have a Plan B.”

What if I have been vaccinated?

Even if you have been vaccinated for Covid-19, you still will need to show proof of a negative test.

What if I recently had Covid-19 and got better?

If you have tested positive for Covid-19 in the past three months but no longer have symptoms, the CDC doesn’t recommend getting tested again.

If you are in this group and have met the criteria to end isolation, the CDC says you can travel as long as you have written permission from a health-care provider or public-health official.

Bring your positive test result and the doctor’s letter to show the airline in lieu of a negative test result.

Does this mean the U.S. has lifted bans on most travel from Europe, the U.K. and other countries?

No. Mr. Biden rejected a last-minute effort by former President Donald Trump to lift those travel restrictions on Jan. 26, citing the worsening pandemic and more-contagious variants of the virus emerging around the world. That means people who aren’t U.S. citizens or permanent residents generally can’t come to the U.S.

from most of Europe, the U.K., Brazil, China and Iran, with a few exceptions. South Africa is also being added to that list due to concerns about how a new coronavirus variant discovered there will respond to vaccines. wise, many countries don’t allow travelers to enter from the U.S.

or continue to impose lengthy quarantine requirements on arrival.

What if I need to change my travel plans now?

Airlines already have done away with most international change fees and are adding more flexibility for people who need to adjust their plans in light of the new testing requirements.

Do I need to get tested again or quarantine when I get back to the U.S.?

The CDC recommends people get a second test three to five days after travel and stay home for seven days (or 10 days without a second test). Testing on its own isn’t a substitute for social distancing and wearing face masks, CDC officials said.

President Biden has said he believes people arriving from abroad should be required to self-quarantine; his executive order says air travelers will be required to follow the CDC’s guidelines, including self-isolation recommendations, “to the extent feasible.

” It isn’t yet clear how that might be enforced, and the order doesn’t specify.

The order also directs federal agencies to develop a plan for ensuring compliance with CDC guidelines and to consider other public-health measures, including consideration of additional testing immediately before departure.

Travel bubbles are under development in some places in an effort to revive air travel, which has plummeted during the pandemic. WSJ explains how reopening the skies without quarantine requirements at both ends of a trip could help reboot the global economy. Illustration: Crystal Tai

Write to Alison Sider at alison.sider@wsj.com

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A State-By-State Guide to Traveling Within the U.S

A guide to the new COVID-19 testing rules for travel to the US

Anyone failing to meet these requirements may be fined $500.

Hawaii

Hawaii's state travel restrictions have been notably hard to navigate, so we wrote a full explainer here. 

All individuals traveling to Hawaii from the mainland U.S. are required to self-quarantine for 10 days or the duration of the visit, whichever is shorter.

On October 15, the state launched a pre-travel testing program, which gives travelers the option to avoid quarantine by showing proof of negative COVID-19 test results, taken within 72 hours of departure by a state-approved trusted testing partner.

Though travelers were originally asked to show test results upon arrival, a November 23 amendment to the program required travelers to upload test results before departing for Hawaii. Now, it is acceptable to bring them in hand, or to upload in advance. Those unable to do either will be required to complete the 10-day quarantine.

(Note that Kauai has paused its participation in the pre-testing program as of December 2, and is requiring all travelers to complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival, with restrictions on how often home rentals can be used as quarantine locations. The island also has a “resort bubble” program that makes it possible for travelers to test quarantine earlier.)

In addition to the quarantine and pre-testing program, some islands and counties are requiring a second test after arrival.

The island of Hawaii is randomly selecting arrivals from the mainland to take a second test upon landing, free of charge, and has restrictions on acceptable places to quarantine, which exclude all short-term rentals and paid commercial lodging.

Maui and Kauai are currently encouraging travelers to take a second test 72 hours after arrival, which is offered free in locations across the islands. 

All travelers must also fill out the online Safe Travels application, which includes questions on health and travel history.

Travelers are encouraged to begin submitting information well before their flight, and will be prompted to submit health details within 24 hours of departure.

As of January 19, all travelers arriving to Maui must also download the AlohaSafe app, or another exposure notification app. Anyone without one of these apps on their mobile phone will be required to quarantine for 10 days upon arrival.

Note that there are also restrictions on inter-island travel, depending on your destination. Honolulu county (which includes Oahu and minor islands) has no restrictions.

To enter the Big Island, visitors must pre-test 72 hours prior to departure, or quarantine upon arrival, only breaking quarantine to get tested, and again when a negative result is received. Maui requires the same pre-testing for inter-island travelers as it does for mainland arrivals.

As noted above, Kauai's mandatory 10-day quarantine order applies to all travelers, regardless of origin. 

Because the restrictions from one island and county to the next vary widely, and change quickly, make sure to check the website of every Hawaiian destination you plan to visit in advance. 

Illinois

While there aren’t any statewide travel restrictions in place, Illinois's largest city, Chicago, has its own travel order, which applies to out-of-state visitors and residents. Though the system previously had three tiers—red, orange, and yellow—it switched to a two-tier system on January 26.

States with more than 15 daily cases per 100,000 people are deemed “orange,” meaning that the city advises against all travel to those states, and those coming from them will be required to either quarantine for 10 days upon entering Chicago, or arrive with a negative test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival.

States with less than 15 daily cases per 100,000 people are marked “yellow,” meaning that residents should still avoid non-essential travel to those destinations; however, there are no requirements to enter Chicago. A color-coded map, denoting which states are red, orange, or yellow, can be found here.

Currently, all states besides Hawaii are marked orange. 

Kansas

Kansas officials have mandated a quarantine for those arriving from high-risk locations or situations (the length of quarantine depends on testing, per the CDC's guidelines).

Currently, that includes anyone who has traveled on a cruise ship or river cruise on or after March 15, recently attended an out-of-state gathering of 500 people or greater where individuals did not social distance and wear masks, or has been notified of exposure to a confirmed case.

This list was last updated December 1, and most recently reviewed on January 28 with no changes. 

Maryland

Residents and visitors entering Maryland are strongly advised to get a COVID test within 72 hours of travel to Maryland, or upon arrival.

Maryland residents who have traveled to a state with a positivity rate above 10 percent (or with a case rate over 20 per 10,000 in the past 10 days) are asked to get tested and self-quarantine at home until negative results are received. Washington, D.C.

, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and West Virginia are exempt from this order, as are commuters. Anyone caught violating this order could face fines up to $5,000, or a sentence of up to a year in prison. 

Источник: https://www.cntraveler.com/story/state-travel-restrictions-during-covid-19

COVID-19 Traveler Information

A guide to the new COVID-19 testing rules for travel to the US

Planning a trip to Alaska? Keep reading. Both the State of Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage have established a variety of health and safety measures to slow the spread of COVID-19. These measures help protect the community, allowing travelers to plan with confidence knowing safety is a priority.

In Anchorage, face masks are required in indoor or communal outdoor public places. Gathering size limitations, physical distancing requirements, and other public health precautions remain in effect. Travelers are also asked to observe statewide testing recommendations.

Many businesses demonstrate their commitment to guest wellness by making the Healthy Anchorage Pledge. Those that take the pledge ensure they're implementing best practices from the CDC and other health authorities, guarantee face masks and physical distancing, and other precautionary measures. Learn about the Healthy Anchorage Pledge.

Click here to read the Municipality of Anchorage's Emergency Order 19.

Click here to read the State of Alaska's COVID-19 Response and Recovery Health Advisory No. 2: International and Interstate Travel.

All visitors arriving in Alaska should submit a Travel Declaration and Self-Isolation Plan, and then either 1) arrive with proof of a qualifying negative COVID-19 test (molecular-based PCR swab test) taken within 72 hours of departure, or 2) follow their employer’s work plan filed with the State of Alaska, or 3) take a free COVID-19 test upon arrival in Alaska, then observe strict social distancing until results arrive.

Beginning Jan. 26, 2021, all travelers arriving in the U.S. from a foreign country must get tested no more than 3 days before their flight departs, then provide proof of the negative result or documentation of having recovered from COVID-19 to the airline before boarding the flight, according to an order from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read more here.

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