3 ways to build a flourishing workplace culture

Contents
  1. Learn The 8 Ways To Engage Employees and Build A Flourishing Workplace – Best Christian Workplaces Institute
  2. 1. Fantastic Teams exemplify a spirit of partnership and collaboration. A flourishing culture is not about “me” but rather, it’s all about “we.” Fantastic Teams are all about achieving shared goals and objectives within a department, across departments and the organization
  3. 2. Life-Giving Work is that which is full of meaning and has significance or purpose that is life-giving. Work is inspirational when staff are devoted to their roles and are able to utilize their skills and spiritual gifts and as a result, love working in the organization
  4. 3. Outstanding Talent means having and keeping highly qualified people with the necessary calling, character, competence, chemistry and contribution to achieve the organization’s mission. “Outstanding Talent is critical to forging a Flourishing workplace culture because,” as Giselle notes, “organizational success is highly affected by the fit, experience, and giftings of the people it attracts, retains, rewards and ultimately promotes into key technical and leadership roles.”
  5. 4. Uplifting Growth improves the performance of individuals, groups and the organization overall so they can meet the challenges of a changing world. Most significantly, growth comes from job related experience, along with interaction with others (managers, mentors and coaches), and from formal developmental events. Giselle has the perfect story:
  6. 5. Rewarding Compensation programs provide tangible resources, including benefits such as medical, retirement and paid time off, in addition to their paycheck. Fair and equitable total compensation plans provide a peace of mind and satisfaction that an individual’s personal and financial needs are met. Rewarding compensation practices remind employees that they are respected and valued—all part of creating a flourishing workplace
  7. 6. Inspirational Leadership, which is highly comprised of character facets, is routinely a top, if not the top predictor of employee engagement across industries and organizations surveyed by BCWI. The extent to which a leader exhibits good character and competence is crucial for Inspirational Leadership
  8. 7. Sustainable Strategyis an organization’s deliberate, effective approach to provide the solution of the compelling, mission-focused need that unites its core constituents
  9. 8. HealthyCommunication is the purposeful exchange of information. It’s effective when leaders involve employees, seek and act on their suggestions, explain reasons behind decisions, and create an environment of open dialogue
  10. Now It’s Your Turn!
  11. Coming Up Next Week on our Continuing Series
  12. Additional Resources
  13. Ask Al
  14. How to Build a Fantastic Company Culture
  15. What is company culture?
  16. What are the benefits of a good company culture?
  17. Benefits for employees
  18. Benefits for employers
  19. How company culture can be a key to success
  20. How to build a fantastic company culture
  21. 1. Define your purpose
  22. 2. Conduct research
  23. 3. Get employee feedback
  24. 4. Create your plan
  25. 5. Get input on the plan
  26. 6. Implement your plan
  27. 7. Monitor progress
  28. 10 Best Ways To Build A Company Culture That Thrives
  29. 1. Find out What Employees Want
  30. 2. Practice Empathy
  31. 4. Rethink Employee Evaluations
  32. 5. Create Mentorship Opportunities
  33. 6. Give the World Something in Return
  34. 7. Commit to Open Communication
  35. 8. Have Each Department Define Its Values
  36. 9. Trust Your People
  37. 10. Take Time to Celebrate
  38. How to Cultivate Work Culture
  39. 1. Align Company and Employee Values 
  40. 2. Foster Positive Relationships
  41. 3. Invest In Your Employees
  42. 4. Recognize Accomplishments
  43. 5. Foster Employee Pride

Learn The 8 Ways To Engage Employees and Build A Flourishing Workplace – Best Christian Workplaces Institute

3 ways to build a flourishing workplace culture

Welcome to the first in a series of ten, content-rich segments designed to inspire and equip you and your organization to create, grow, and sustain a workplace culture of:

Fantastic teams
Lifegiving work
Outstanding talent
Uplifting growth
Rewarding compensation
Inspirational leadership
Sustainable strategy
Healthy communication

These eight drivers make up The FLOURISH Model, the cornerstone of BCWI’s global consulting work with more than 1,000 Christian organizations in the U.S., Canada, and around the world.

Over the next ten weeks, I want to put The FLOURISH Model in your hands.

I want you to grasp its foundational truths and direct applications that can free your church, your parachurch organization, or your Christian-led business to be all that God intends.

I believe this can happen in the next ten weeks as you read along and experience each of the ten accompanying podcasts.

In this opening article, I want to give you a helpful, big-picture overview of what you can expect for each of the next ten weeks: relevant, practical, proven principles, supported by great, memorable stories, insights and action steps you and your teams can use to build a thriving workplace to fulfill your organization’s mission.

Giselle Jenkins, Best Christian Workplaces Institute

Each week, I’ll introduce you to a guest expert whose character, experience and insightful wisdom can help you see for yourself how The FLOURISH Model can work for your organization. It’s all about discovering the Eight Best Ways to Build a Flourishing Workplace Culture.

Here is week one, I want to introduce you to BCWI’s Director of Consulting Services, Giselle Jenkins. Giselle brings the leadership and real-world perspective of  25 years in people management with faith-based organizations, churches and Christian-led companies.

Here’s a big-picture overview of the Eight Best Ways to Build a Flourishing Workplace Culture.

1. Fantastic Teams exemplify a spirit of partnership and collaboration. A flourishing culture is not about “me” but rather, it’s all about “we.” Fantastic Teams are all about achieving shared goals and objectives within a department, across departments and the organization

See for Yourself!

“Several years ago,” says Giselle, “I began working with a non-profit struggling across the board with employee engagement, including teamwork. We suggested focus groups to dive deeper into what changes employees wanted to see to raise each individual’s ability to contribute to their fullest.

“They came up with 21 suggested changes and then took accountability  by creating a shared document, listing out common goals for each of the 21 suggested changes for coming years and which team would work on which goal and post weekly progress.

“Each team could see how they played a part in the organization’s overall improvement. In doing so, they saw how they depended on each other. Through this coordinated effort they supercharged their cross-departmental teamwork and produced the single highest-ever one-year improvement in engagement.

Bottom line: “Knowing the goals, depending on each other for excellence, and keeping their targeted finish lines in constant view were keys for their success. That’s what makes fantastic teams.”

2. Life-Giving Work is that which is full of meaning and has significance or purpose that is life-giving. Work is inspirational when staff are devoted to their roles and are able to utilize their skills and spiritual gifts and as a result, love working in the organization

See for Yourself!

“I think of Hope International, which serves to invest in the dreams of families in the world’s underserved communities as we proclaim and live the Gospel. Hope International has infused their people with deepening satisfaction of their own work by training staff to tell some of the organization’s life-changing stories.

“A synonym for Life-Giving Work” is ‘fun,’ which Hope International has helped instill through the simple joy of a ping-pong table at work that builds camaraderie.”

3. Outstanding Talent means having and keeping highly qualified people with the necessary calling, character, competence, chemistry and contribution to achieve the organization’s mission. “Outstanding Talent is critical to forging a Flourishing workplace culture because,” as Giselle notes, “organizational success is highly affected by the fit, experience, and giftings of the people it attracts, retains, rewards and ultimately promotes into key technical and leadership roles.”

See for Yourself!

“Recently,” says Giselle, “we worked with a large, urban, multi-site church with a wonderful reputation. The first of four essentials that make up Outstanding Talent is attracting great talent, and this church was able to knock it the park.

Their “talent,” however, helped leadership see that they were less than satisfied with the other three essentials of rewarding, promoting and retaining talent. As a result, they were losing some of their best people.

Leaders were at a loss as to how to solve the problem of keeping talent at their smaller campuses, because promotions were unly, certainly in the short run.

Solution: “We suggested each campus do a short anonymous survey to ask staff what it would take to keep their engaged and enthusiastic people. The three most-common responses:

  • ‘I would to work with my supervisor on a one-year development plan, so I can grow and learn.’
  • ‘If I do a great job, I would a specific recognition, a small reward-tied to my progress.’
  • ‘I would to see that there is a career path here and be given the opportunity to get on the path, if I’m willing to make the effort.’

“It was easy for leaders to say ‘yes’ to this list, especially as this predominately millennial group of outstanding talent became even more engaged.”

4. Uplifting Growth improves the performance of individuals, groups and the organization overall so they can meet the challenges of a changing world. Most significantly, growth comes from job related experience, along with interaction with others (managers, mentors and coaches), and from formal developmental events. Giselle has the perfect story:

See for Yourself!

“We began working with a large rescue mission who is making a terrific impact, but their employees were really struggling at the front line.  Rescue mission work is amazingly challenging, and everyone needs to be primed and ready to serve some of the most hurting and struggling people in the nation.

“ many organizations, the mission’s front-line supervisors had been placed in their positions without training or preparation on how to grow and develop others.

We worked with leadership to develop basic supervisor training, skills around communication, delegation, giving and receiving feedback.

Employees were equipped with clear directions through accurate job descriptions, how to conduct performance reviews and even the keys to effective one-on-one meetings.

“The turnaround was amazing. Employees showed their gratitude for their supervisors’ new abilities by giving them strong positive feedback on how they felt cared about as people with new role clarity.”

5. Rewarding Compensation programs provide tangible resources, including benefits such as medical, retirement and paid time off, in addition to their paycheck. Fair and equitable total compensation plans provide a peace of mind and satisfaction that an individual’s personal and financial needs are met. Rewarding compensation practices remind employees that they are respected and valued—all part of creating a flourishing workplace

See for Yourself!

We learned that a 12-year client based in a fairly affluent region wasn’t paying competitive salaries to its staff.

To their credit, they did a study, built a competitive salary structure and over the course of three years became competitive with their compensation packages.

As a result, the organization reduced their turnover and retained their top talent. Best of all they’ve now begun to experience the growth they initially envisioned.

6. Inspirational Leadership, which is highly comprised of character facets, is routinely a top, if not the top predictor of employee engagement across industries and organizations surveyed by BCWI. The extent to which a leader exhibits good character and competence is crucial for Inspirational Leadership

See for Yourself!

Says Giselle, “A national, non-profit organization had experienced back-to-back leadership “failures” and, as a result, was losing their clientele, talent, funding.

After surveying with BCWI, the new president gathered the staff together to solicit specific strategies for improvement.

He made some key leadership changes, promoting leaders who typified the organization’s values and biblical servanthood.

“Through it all the president demonstrated consistent honesty, transparency, careful listening, humility, collaboration and trustworthiness. In short, he modeled inspirational leadership. As a result, the staff became excited about the organization’s future, believing more in the mission and vision, and experiencing more fun at work.

7. Sustainable Strategy is an organization’s deliberate, effective approach to provide the solution of the compelling, mission-focused need that unites its core constituents

See for Yourself!

“I remember a leadership team that was very mindful to measure their organization’s goals. The problem was they didn’t communicate any of it with the staff. Thus, the employees didn’t see how their work was impacting and meeting the organization’s goals. Naturally, they couldn’t row in the same direction for the betterment of the organization and their own wellbeing.

“Once leadership saw the value of shared the organization’s goals and what was required of their staff to meet them, their people aligned creating a much more productive workplace.”

8. Healthy Communication is the purposeful exchange of information. It’s effective when leaders involve employees, seek and act on their suggestions, explain reasons behind decisions, and create an environment of open dialogue

See for Yourself!

Giselle: “I recently had the privilege of working with a Christian K-12 school whose turnaround story took the cake. Their “before” story was dreadful, as they were losing students and teachers, left and right. “Final decisions” were being made in a vacuum, without faculty and staff being consulted. Leadership was viewed as authoritarian, at best.

“Fortunately, a gifted leader from a partnering ministry was invited in to listen and find out what faculty, staff and students needed. He formed action groups and gave them authority to make decisions.

He shared reasons for decisions he needed to make and was very transparent and open about how the school was doing. Rather than pushing conflict situations, he welcomed challenges and pushbacks. He coached the existing leaders on being inclusive and servant leaders.

And he made a difficult but important decision to change out one leader that couldn’t adjust.”

Result: “Employee engagement and communication increased, while student retention rose. In the words of communications guru and pastor of North Point Ministries Jeff Henderson, “The better you communicate, the better you lead.”

Now It’s Your Turn!

Which of these eight drivers sparks a favorite story of a person’s Christ- character, or a team’s amazing achievement at work? Which colleagues or departments might be encouraged and inspired by this story?

Coming Up Next Week on our Continuing Series

“The Eight Ways to Build a Flourishing Workplace,”
Jim Tomberlin, Founder & CEO of MultiSite Solutions, on
“The FLOURISH Model in Action”

Additional Resources

Download the 8 Drivers Reference Guide for FREE.

Fantastic Teams
Life-giving Work
Outstanding Talent
Uplifting Growth
Rewarding Compensation
Inspirational Leadership
Sustainable Strategy
Healthy Communication 

One or more of these eight measures of workplace culture
is either strengthening (or weakening) your organization right now.

Ask Al

Al would love to address your questions about creating a flourishing workplace culture. Send an email to AskAl@bcwinstitute.org

Click here to learn more!

Источник: https://www.bcwinstitute.org/flourishing-workplaces/8-ways-to-build-a-flourishing-workplace-culture/

How to Build a Fantastic Company Culture

3 ways to build a flourishing workplace culture

  • A fantastic company culture can reduce recruitment-and-retention costs.
  • Employees rank company culture highly when choosing a career move.
  • You need a mission and vision for your company to successfully create a great company culture.
  • This article is for business owners who want to create a company culture that works for all employees.

Your business is only as good as the people who work for it, which is why company culture is so important. If you follow the right steps, you'll be on your way to creating a fantastic company culture.

Read on to learn how making your business a great place to work benefits both your employees and your company, and the seven steps to take to develop a positive company culture.

What is company culture?

Company culture is the business's shared values, goals and behaviors. It affects how employees interact, the way work is executed and the decisions a company makes. Company culture includes the following elements:

  • Company mission. Your company mission is the purpose of the enterprise. It says why your business exists, what you hope to achieve and what you value. A strong mission is important because it gives employees something to rally around – a reason to work at your company (beyond a paycheck).
  • Management style. There are several management styles a business can adopt when creating a company culture. The key is to stick to the one you choose. [Read related article: What Kind of Leader Are You? 9 Leadership Types and Their Strengths]
  • Work environment. When establishing a company culture, consider how you want your employees to collaborate. If you are in an office, is it an open space or walled-off cubicles? If everyone is working from home, are they required to check in regularly or on an as-needed basis? Ask yourself these questions when creating the work environment you want for your business.
  • Expectations. Employees want to do a great job, and it's up to the business owner and executives to define what that entails. With a good company culture, employees should know what is expected of them and the consequences if they fail. The more transparent you are, the better the company culture you'll create.
  • Goals. Businesses need goals to grow, and employees must understand those objectives to meet them. Ask employees to strive to meet milestones that contribute to the business's goals. Doing so can increase productivity, particularly if there are incentives for meeting goals.

Key takeaway: Company culture includes the organization's mission, management style, work environment, expectations and goals.

What are the benefits of a good company culture?

A great company culture has benefits for employers and employees a. Here are some of the big ones:

Benefits for employees

If you create a great company culture, your employees will look forward to coming to work and will take pride in their output. Here are some more benefits for employees:

  • Transparency. A 2013 survey by TINYpulse found that transparency is the No. 1 factor in employee happiness. When your business's culture is focused on transparency, everybody knows what's expected of them, how business is faring and the direction of the company.
  • Positive team morale. A good company culture can bring employees together. When everyone shares values and a mission, your workforce becomes a team.
  • Job satisfaction. If your employees their work environment and are happy with the people they work with and for, they are more ly to be satisfied in their jobs.
  • Improved well-being. Toxic work environments can harm not only productivity but also your employees' health. Several studies have shown that employees at high-stress companies spend more on healthcare, miss more days of work and experience more on-the-job accidents, Harvard Business Review reported. A healthy company culture can do the opposite. When your employees don't feel overwhelmed or afraid of losing their jobs, their well-being may improve.

Benefits for employers

A fantastic workplace culture benefits business owners, too. Here are some of the advantages:

  • Reduced recruitment-and-retention costs. Recruiting and retaining employees can be expensive. A key way to reduce turnover is by creating a fantastic company culture, because employees will stay with the company if they are happy there.
  • Increased engagement. Companies that foster an open and collaborative work culture tend to have engaged employees. That engagement has a direct impact on productivity and, in turn, the company's bottom line.
  • Healthier employees. Work-life balance is essential to keeping top talent. A company culture that supports a healthier work-life balance will have healthier employees overall, and there will be fewer reasons for workers to take sick days.
  • Improved image. If you offer employees a fantastic company culture, people will hear about it, either by word of mouth or on online company review boards. When employees tout your company's great culture, it will be a lot easier to recruit talent.

Key takeaway: The benefits of a good company culture for employees include transparency, positive team morale, job satisfaction and improved well-being, and the benefits for businesses include reduced costs, increased engagement, healthier employees and an improved image.

How company culture can be a key to success

Company cultures are as unique as the business owners who create them. The successful ones are grounded in the reasons they started the business.

Take Melissa Wirt, a mother of five and owner of Latched Mama, an online nursing-clothing store. She started her small business on her dining room table and now has more than 30 employees, most of whom are moms. Latched Mama is now headquartered in a 16,000-square-foot warehouse. Wirt credits a large part of her success to her company culture.

“When it came time to start hiring employees, I had this dream of hiring those who could use love and support,” Wirt told Business News Daily. “I also realized I wanted to hire moms. They can speak to moms better than someone who doesn't know motherhood.”

That mom-centric approach also extends to the work environment at Latched Mama. Moms are encouraged to bring their babies to work, with most children transitioning out around 15 months. At Latched Mama, employees are moms first. If a child is sick, they stay home; if a school play is in the middle of the day, they go; if a mom is having a bad morning, a mental health day is allowed.

“I had a lot of people tell me it wasn't going to work,” Wirt said. “Nobody has abused it yet.”

Key takeaway: When a company culture is aligned with the business's mission, it has an increased chance of success.

How to build a fantastic company culture

Creating a great company culture takes time and commitment, and it must be built on a strong foundation. Follow these seven steps to ensure your company culture is a success:

1. Define your purpose

Successful company cultures are grounded in a mission, a vision and core values, which should drive all of your decisions.

For example, are you going to be socially conscious? What are you doing to embody your core values and goals? Ask yourself those sorts of questions, said Angela Simpson, a human resources knowledge advisor at the Society for Human Resource Management.

2. Conduct research

To create a fantastic company culture, you have to understand what motivates your employees and what matters most to them. For example, a flexible work schedule is great only if that's what your staff craves.

You also have to look at the impact any actions will have on your company's bottom line. For example, it wouldn't make sense to offer free meals if that would end up bankrupting the business.

3. Get employee feedback

Whether you're creating a company culture from scratch or trying to reinvent an existing one, employees' voices must be heard. If employees aren't happy at work, their productivity will suffer.

Survey employees to get a sense of how they feel. Here are some examples of questions to ask:

  • Do you feel your opinion is valued?
  • How many times have you spoken to your supervisor in the past three months?
  • Do you have the resources and tools necessary to do your job?
  • Do you think your manager listens to you?

4. Create your plan

Armed with your research and employee survey results, begin to create a company culture. That means crafting your mission, listing the company's values and planning how the company will achieve its goals.

When developing your plan, remember that, in addition to focusing on your company as a whole, your company culture should account for employees' individual circumstances, said Torin Ellis, an HR consultant and founder of The Torin Ellis Brand. “Culture starts in the community,” Ellis said, and a company culture should be able to meet employees' unique needs.

5. Get input on the plan

Before you implement your plan, get input from executives and employees. You don't want to create a company culture everyone despises. Listen to the feedback, and be willing to make adjustments. A company culture evolves with the business and its employees.

6. Implement your plan

Once you've finalized your plan and everyone is on board, it's time to begin implementing it. That doesn't mean changing the entire organizational structure overnight. Rather, make changes slowly – for example, by hiring employees with shared values or tweaking management requirements.

7. Monitor progress

Evaluate what's working and what isn't. Communication and transparency are key components of a successful company culture. If changes are needed, don't be afraid to make them.

Creating a fantastic company culture takes time, but if you stick to your plan and tweak it along the way, you'll have a vibrant and flourishing business that is a coveted place to work.

Key takeaway: To create a fantastic company culture, define your mission, vision, and goals; get feedback from employees; monitor progress; and implement any necessary changes.

Источник: https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/15840-create-a-great-company-culture.html

10 Best Ways To Build A Company Culture That Thrives

3 ways to build a flourishing workplace culture

Even now, company culture is an often-misunderstood thing. Leaders sometimes take a hands-off approach when it comes to culture, when what it needs is a nurturing touch.

Employees depend on a cohesive, compelling and, maybe most importantly, resilient culture. And so do your customers, if you want them to pick you instead of a competitor. Here’s how to build one that ticks all these boxes.

1. Find out What Employees Want

One recent report found that around 64% of employees don’t think their company has a robust workplace culture.

That’s a huge disconnect. Company leaders can improve employee buy-in and engagement by asking them directly what they value, what they want in a company and what changes in the workplace would inspire and empower them.

2. Practice Empathy

Empathy is probably the most valuable skill humans learn in their lifetimes. Human society relies on it, and so must company culture.

Demonstrating empathy in the workplace requires that we reserve judgment of others, expect and encourage the best of people and develop pro-social company values. A culture built on empathy has real staying power.

For a company and its culture to be durable and resilient, it must rely on a foundation of ongoing learning and experimentation.

Company leaders must cast a wide net when it comes to knowledge and perspectives, and they have to take an interest in every part of their company and industry to understand how all the pieces in the machine must evolve.

4. Rethink Employee Evaluations

Company leadership touching base with employees and helping them grow, make adjustments or reach for more challenging responsibilities is part of any company’s fabric and culture.

But not every employee evaluation format is successful in inspiring employees and keeping them engaged over time. For a culture to thrive, it should depend on less formal and more frequent meetings between leaders and team members.

5. Create Mentorship Opportunities

In addition to changing the style and pacing of employee evaluations, companies should also take every opportunity to create mentorship opportunities. Whichever way you look at it, this can only strengthen your company’s culture and make it more resilient.

Newer employees will learn the ropes faster with less frustration, existing employees can explore cross-training and, at the same time, the company ensures that it retains skill mastery over time, even as veterans depart.

6. Give the World Something in Return

Social responsibility and workers’ rights are hot issues right now. Customers are wise to the fact that they can deserve something more from companies in return for brand loyalty: things cleaner supply chains, fairer working conditions, community give-backs, more inclusiveness and constructive participation in social issues.

These are issues that never go style, and the companies that refuse to compromise on them are liest to thrive in the long term.

7. Commit to Open Communication

Mutual understanding is key in any human enterprise. When it comes to company culture, open communication is about whether, and how often, you choose to share information about the state of the company with employees.

It also requires that you choose leaders and representatives within your organization as much for their candor, clarity, willingness to listen and other “soft skills” as for their mastery of industry-related skills.

8. Have Each Department Define Its Values

We’ve mentioned company values a couple of times already. But if yours is most companies, you don’t have one team, but several. Each of these teams represents a distinct cultural microcosm with unique missions and values.

What are these? Make time for your departments and teams to create and then regularly revisit a set of values that’s all their own. It makes the purpose behind the work more real and gives it a better chance of sustainability over time.

9. Trust Your People

Everybody says, “Trust must begin somewhere.” But how many people live it?

The strength and staying power of a company, and the culture it exports to the community and the world, depends a great deal on how willing that company is to trust employees at every level. People want to do their best work and make independent decisions about how they do it.

They also benefit from having time and opportunity set aside regularly so they can try new ideas — even, as the case may be, ideas that don’t pan out as expected. Trusting your employees’ intuition, hunches and willingness to do what’s best is an investment that regularly pays dividends.

10. Take Time to Celebrate

A productivity-at-all-costs mentality is unhealthy for everybody involved. Companies are often quick to focus on what’s not going 100% according to plan.

But triumphs and milestones, and the people responsible for them, are very much worth celebrating. Find creative ways to recognize outstanding performance.

And when the company as a whole accomplishes something awesome, include everybody in the accolades with a celebration and time away from their workstations.

These 10 fundamentals should paint a picture of what a thriving company culture can, and should, look . It’s relatively easy to develop a culture that works for a day or a week. It’s a little harder, but infinitely more rewarding, to create one that lasts and builds on its successes over time.

Источник: https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamcraig/2019/10/29/10-best-ways-to-build-a-company-culture-that-thrives/

How to Cultivate Work Culture

3 ways to build a flourishing workplace culture

Creating an outstanding work culture that accurately represents a company’s values begins with strong leadership. When leadership creates and embodies a work culture that matches the company’s mission and vision, it becomes part of the company DNA.

In today’s workplace, company culture is a major factor in attracting and retaining employees, and a lot of companies are working to create an engaging work environment that stands out against the more traditional workplaces and appeals to newer generations.

Millennials are the largest generation in the workforce, and when you factor in the workplace entrance of Generation Z, it will only increase the complexity of managing across multiple generations in a way that engages and resonates throughout the current and future workforce.

For inspiration, a lot of companies try to mimic workplaces Netflix, Google, and Zappos who have reputations for being exciting, highly desirable work environments.

Consider, however, that their models may not work for companies in different industries, regions, or those with smaller budgets.

Instead, approach your own company culture by thinking about your unique business goals and values and how you can attract and retain employees who embody those things and will help you focus on the things that matter to your company. 

What can you do that would make your work culture unique, but still stay true to who you are as a company? What is it that highly engaged workplaces have in common that’s missing from your strategy? We’ve compiled five strategies that a highly engaged workforce implements in order to stay authentic to the brand and employees a:

88% of employees who are well versed in company values say they are engaged. @ClearCompany has 5 ways to help engage your employees.

1. Align Company and Employee Values 

When interviewing a candidate, ask yourself, is this candidate a good cultural fit for my company? You can train anyone on job skills, but you can’t change someone’s attitude. It’s imperative that companies and employees have shared values.

For example, a tobacco company or plastic manufacturer ly won’t attract a candidate for whom environmental or health issues are paramount. But, employees who are well-versed in company values are more engaged overall.

Employees who understand company values understand what they are there to represent within the organization’s culture and brand. 

So, where do you display your values? Can candidates easily access them? Do they play a part in your performance culture? Are they listed on the website, in the lunchroom, on a T-shirt? Values should be far more than just words kept in a binder somewhere. 

Make sure your employees understand your company values with these steps:

  • Define your values: Clearly outline what your values are and what they mean. Go beyond the bumper sticker to ensure you can provide examples of your values in action within your organization.
  • Add values to your performance conversations: Don’t just put your values on a poster in the breakroom and leave it at that. Discuss how your employees are demonstrating values in their performance, and how those values matter and contribute to individual success. 
  • Put your values on the website: Make your values known to your employees before they even apply. Placing your priorities front and center will help attract candidates who hold similar values and want to be a part of what you’re doing.
  • Add important values to your employee email signatures: Are there 2-3 values that really mean something to you? To your team? Put them on your email signatures. This does a few things — first, it creates a shared language, crucial for bonding and camaraderie. Second, it shows that you embody the company values yourself. As an added bonus, clients can easily see your values and find common ground there, too. 

2. Foster Positive Relationships

A highly engaged workplace fosters events and gatherings that help employees connect with their coworkers and build relationships. They create a fun, relaxed atmosphere where employees can step away from their desks and engage in a casual way. People with a friend at work are 7x more ly to engage fully in their work.

Many managers don’t realize the importance of internal relationships. Building these relationships can come in a lot of unique shapes, so here are some ideas to help you get started:

  • Start a company-wide book club. This is something that works whether you’re all in the same office or spread across the country. Whether you choose business books or popular fiction, your employees can use the same technology they use during the day to connect on things not work-related. 
  • Volunteer opportunities. Social responsibility is one of the best things a company can do for its employees’ well-being and engagement levels. Working together to build a house, serve a meal, weed a garden, or connect with an underserved community not only brings people together, but it also gives back to your neighborhood, city or region.
  • Create affinity groups. If you are part of a large company, it can be tough to know that Sam in accounting is frustrated by the same issues with puppy training that Bailey in marketing is struggling with. A great company intranet can help employees who aren’t in physical proximity get to know one another. Encourage employees to talk about themselves and create spaces to discuss hobbies and interests. 
  • Plan regular outings. Company outings offer a chance for new interpersonal connections, and they’re an easy way to facilitate interactions outside of the conference room.

3. Invest In Your Employees

A fundamental part of creating an engaged work environment is making it clear to your employees that management cares about them and their future. Be transparent about developments happening within the business; it will help foster an environment where employees feel they are needed. 

You can also show your employees that you value them by investing in their individual development, too.

Assign them to mentors who can help them meet their goals, build out performance plans to reach promotions, treat everyone equally, and provide them with unbiased managers who will evaluate them fairly.

Ask them about the things they need to be successful, and what they want for their careers. When you put their future as a priority, they know you’re investing in them for the long term, not just the company’s immediate needs.

What can you do that would make your work culture unique, but still stay true to who you are as a company? @ClearCompany has the answers for you:

4. Recognize Accomplishments

Employee recognition is a low cost, high impact strategy to boost engagement. An employee wants to know that when they’ve put in their best effort, someone’s going to notice.

It can be as simple as their manager directly informing them of a job well done or an email shout-out from a peer. Consider what kind of recognition your employees respond well to; whether it be rewards and bonuses or private praise.

The important thing is that you demonstrate that you see your employees and appreciate the work they do. 

5. Foster Employee Pride

It’s important for employees to know how their contributions help to accomplish the overall goal of the company. When an employee can see how they are contributing to the success of the company, they take more pride in their work.

Use a system that visualizes and tracks goal alignment to increase employee engagement by helping employees see how their efforts and work fit into the company as a whole. Goal alignment helps everyone from entry-level to C-Suite understand how their place fits into the organization.

Instead of feeling a cog in the machine, employees can see exactly how their work brings value.

ClearCompany helps provide structure and organization to the process of building your company culture from the ground up. Get your custom tour of our Talent Management Platform to see how you can go beyond employee management to a thriving employee culture. Sign up for a demo with our experts today.

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Источник: https://blog.clearcompany.com/5-ways-to-cultivate-your-work-culture-engage-your-employees

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